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DEC
22
5 HRS

'The Imitation Game' to Be Honored by Human Rights Campaign

'The Imitation Game' to Be Honored by Human Rights Campaign

The Human Rights Campaign, the nation's largest LGBT civil rights organization, announced on Monday that it will honor the creative talent responsible for Morten Tyldum's The Imitation Game — a film about the life of the British scientist-turned-World War II hero Alan Turning, a gay man who was prosecuted after the war for "homosexual acts" — at its New York Gala Dinner on Jan. 31 at the Waldorf Astoria in New York.

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DEC
22
11 HRS

The Screener Game: Why You Got the Ones You Got When You Got Them

The Screener Game: Why You Got the Ones You Got When You Got Them

A version of this article appeared in the December Awards Playbook edition of The Hollywood Reporter.

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DEC
21
1 day

Film Expert: Sony "Surrender" Joins Long History of Studios Bowing to "Intimidation Tactics" (Guest Column)

Film Expert: Sony "Surrender" Joins Long History of Studios Bowing to "Intimidation Tactics" (Guest Column)

On the evening of Dec. 4, 1930, inside the ornate Mozart Hall in Berlin, Universal's antiwar epic All Quiet on the Western Front was just starting to unspool when spectators noticed a rancid smell in the theater — stink bombs — and spotted dozens of white mice scurrying down the aisles. Women began to scream and, amid the chaos, a cadre of Nazi storm troopers stood up, pointed at the screen and screamed, "Judenfilm!" The Nazis — still over two years away from turning Germany into a gangster state — had vandalized and infiltrated the theater to shut down a Hollywood film that depicted the Great War as a muddy death trap. Days of protests and street demonstrations followed: The Nazis vowed that either All Quiet on the Western Front would be withdrawn or the theaters world burn.

It worked. Germany banned the film that its own censors had earlier cleared for domestic release. The capitulation — both political and cinematic — gave the nascent National Socialists a huge victory, gaining stature for a fringe party and exposing the wheezing Weimar Republic as a paper tiger. "The police are powerless," chortled Joseph Goebbels, the future propaganda minister for the Third Reich.

Read more Sony Lawyer: 'The Interview' "Will Be Distributed"

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DEC
19
3 DAYS

See Bradley Cooper Play a Reluctant Hero in New 'American Sniper' Clip (Exclusive)

See Bradley Cooper Play a Reluctant Hero in New 'American Sniper' Clip (Exclusive)

American Sniper is not off to the sort of start that Warner Bros. wanted for its principal Oscar hopeful this season — after landing a spot on the AFI's year-end top 10 list, it was completely excluded from the SAG and Golden Globe nominations and recognized only in the action movie categories of the Critics' Choice noms — but Oscar nomination voting doesn't begin until Dec. 29, and there is still time for Academy members to catch up with and/or come around on Clint Eastwood's drama about the deadliest American sniper of the Iraq War, Chris Kyle, who is played in the film by Bradley Cooper.

I think they might.

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DEC
19
3 DAYS

Palm Springs Film Fest: Robert Duvall, Alejandro G. Inarritu Join List of Honorees

Palm Springs Film Fest: Robert Duvall, Alejandro G. Inarritu Join List of Honorees

The Judge's supporting actor Robert Duvall will receive this year's Icon Award and Birdman's co-writer and director Alejandro G. Inarritu will receive this year's Director of the Year Award at the Palm Springs International Film Festival's 26th annual Awards Gala on Jan. 3, PSIFF announced on Friday. The fest will run Jan. 2-12.

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DEC
19
3 DAYS

Foreign Oscar Shortlist: Great Choices — and Horrible Headscratchers, as Usual (Analysis)

Foreign Oscar Shortlist: Great Choices — and Horrible Headscratchers, as Usual (Analysis)

On Friday morning, the Academy released its foreign-language committee's shortlist of nine filmsselected from a record 83 submissions this year — from which the five nominees for the best foreign-language film Oscar will soon be chosen.

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DEC
19
4 DAYS

Meet the Bros. Dardenne, Belgium's National Treasures Behind 'Two Days, One Night'

If you don't frequent the Cannes, Telluride, Toronto and New York film festivals, or at least your local art house movie theater, you may not know the names Jean-Pierre Dardenne and Luc Dardenne. But, as someone who does, take my word for it: These soft-spoken, unassuming sexagenarian brothers from Belgium are as talented and consistently on-the-mark as any filmmakers in the world — and they have been for years.

That's why I find it so utterly unbelievable that the Academy has never even nominated one of their projects for the best foreign-language film Oscar, even though four have been submitted by their motherland over the years — and why, I must confess, I am crossing my fingers that this grave injustice will be corrected, or at least not extended, when the Academy, sometime in the next 48 hours, reveals the names of the nine films that its foreign-language committee or executive committee has deemed worthy of this year's Oscar shortlist. As I see it, the Dardennes' latest, Two Days, One Night, deserves to be among the finalists as much as any of this year's record 83 submissions from around the globe.

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DEC
18
4 DAYS

People Magazine Awards: 'Cake' Star Jennifer Aniston Wins First Film-Acting Prize of Career

People Magazine Awards: 'Cake' Star Jennifer Aniston Wins First Film-Acting Prize of Career

Sure, the inaugural People Magazine Awards, which took place on Thursday evening at the Beverly Hilton in Los Angeles and was televised nationally on NBC, was a blatant "pseudoevent," in the sense that it only existed as an excuse to generate attention for those associated with it: People, the 40-year-old weekly fan magazine; Entertainment Weekly, its sister publication; and whatever celebrities they could get to show up and accept prizes and/or perform in person.

(As was the case with November's Hollywood Film Awards — also put together by Dick Clark Productions, which shares a parent company with THR — there weren't nominees for the various awards, but rather just predetermined winners, and the process by which they were selected kept deliberately vague.)

But, even so, for those who were chosen and did show up and happen to also be in the hunt for Oscar nominations, the evening offered a nice opportunity to get a little free publicity before the town shuts down for the holidays — in the midst of which nomination voting will begin, on Dec. 29.

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DEC
18
4 DAYS

Sony Hack: Father of North Korean Leader Was Obsessed With Hollywood Movies

Sony Hack: Father of North Korean Leader Was Obsessed With Hollywood Movies

Kim Jong-il, North Korea's Supreme Leader from July 1994 until his death in Dec. 2011, was credited with many far-fetched accomplishments during his lifetime, from inventing the hamburger to curing dwarfism to shooting 11 holes-in-one the first time he played golf to never having had a bowel movement. But one remarkable thing that he actually did do, according to reliable reports, is watch more American movies than most people who work in Hollywood.

And it was under this man's roof that North Korea's current dictator — Kim Jong-il's son Kim Jong Un, the man lampooned in the comedy The Interview and suspected of authorizing a cyberterrorism attack on Sony Pictures in retaliation — came of age.

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DEC
17
5 DAYS

Oscars: 'Gone Girl' Composer Trent Reznor Reveals How He Gets Into David Fincher's Head

Oscars: 'Gone Girl' Composer Trent Reznor Reveals How He Gets Into David Fincher's Head

A version of this story first appeared in the Jan. 9 issue of The Hollywood Reporter.

"Is it good? I’m not sure, but I know I worked my ass off," Trent Reznor, the Nine Inch Nails frontman/Oscar-winning film composer told me of his latest score — the one that he and Atticus Ross put together for David Fincher's smash-hit Gone Girl — when we sat down for an hour-long conversation a few weeks ago in Beverly Hills.

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DEC
17
5 DAYS

Feinberg Forecast: Heated Race Heading Into the Holidays

Feinberg Forecast: Heated Race Heading Into the Holidays

As the dust settles after a week that brought SAG, Golden Globe and Critics' Choice nominations, THR's awards analyst tries to make sense of the new landscape

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DEC
16
6 DAYS

Oscars: Is 'Snowpiercer' Actress Tilda Swinton Being Underestimated?

Oscars: Is 'Snowpiercer' Actress Tilda Swinton Being Underestimated?

The holiday season is always a bit hectic, so it is understandable if you, like me until recently, failed to notice something that's actually been brewing under the surface of the awards discussion for some time: namely, the grassroots support behind the best supporting actress Oscar candidacy of Tilda Swinton for her work in Bong Joon-ho's Snowpiercer.

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DEC
16
6 DAYS

SAG-Globes Noms: Is Jennifer Aniston In and Laura Dern Out for Oscar Nod? Not So Fast

SAG-Globes Noms: Is Jennifer Aniston In and Laura Dern Out for Oscar Nod? Not So Fast

Far too often, people forget the major distinctions — in terms of size, origin and background — between the groups that determine the nominations for the Screen Actors Guild, Golden Globe and Academy awards. SAG noms are determined by 2,100 randomly selected, U.S.-based members of SAG-AFTRA; Golden Globe noms are determined by about 90 non-American journalists; and Oscar noms are determined by approximately 6,000 people from all over the world who actually make movies.

Because many — in fact, most — Oscar-nominated performances do receive SAG and/or Globe noms en route to their Oscar noms, there is an assumption that performances that do not snag SAG and/or Globe noms instantly fall out of the running for an Oscar nom, and that performances that do snag SAG and/or Globe noms are locks for Oscar noms. A look at the last 12 years of results from all three groups, though, does not bear this out entirely.

Read more Oscars: 39 Screenplays That Matter

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DEC
16
6 DAYS

Palm Springs Film Fest: Oscar Hopeful 'Selma' to Open Academy-Favorite Gathering

Palm Springs Film Fest: Oscar Hopeful 'Selma' to Open Academy-Favorite Gathering

A screening of Selma, the Golden Globe-nominated drama about Dr. Martin Luther King Jr., will kick off the 26th annual Palm Springs International Film Festival on Jan. 2, the fest announced Tuesday. The opening-night slot — and a post-screening reception at the Palm Springs Art Museum at which talent from the film will be on hand — will help to shine a spotlight on the Paramount contender in front of a desert community in which hundreds of Academy members live or have second (or third) homes.

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