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DEC
2
4 MOS

THR Panel: 6 Breakthrough Performers on Difficult Directors and Working Without a Script (Video)

THR Panel: 6 Breakthrough Performers on Difficult Directors and Working Without a Script (Video)

The Hollywood Reporter's inaugural Breakthrough Performers Panel (shot at The Warwick in Hollywood) was comprised of Barkhad Abdi, 28 (the Somali pirate Muse in Paul Greengrass' Captain Phillips); Adele Exarchopoulos, 20 (the young lesbian Adele in Abdellatif Kechiche's Blue Is the Warmest Color); Greta Gerwig, 30 (the lost soul Frances Halladay in Noah Baumbach's Frances Ha); Kathryn Hahn, 40 (the sexually reawakened Rachel in Jill Soloway's Afternoon Delight); David Oyelowo, 37 (the butler's oldest son, Louis Gaines, in Lee Daniels' Lee Daniels’ The Butler); and Olivia Wilde, 29 (the romantically confused Kate in Joe Swanberg's Drinking Buddies).

FEINBERG FORECAST: How 'American Hustle' Changed the Field  

These performers' 2013 breakthroughs all are different: One is an actor's first credit (Abdi), another is an actress' 50th (Hahn); one came from an American in an American movie (Gerwig), another from a foreigner in a foreign-language movie (Exarchopoulos); one is in a summer blockbuster (Oyelowo), another in a microbudget indie (Wilde). In all cases, these actors have given performances that merit more attention than they have been receiving.

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MAY
20
11 MOS

Cannes: First Look at Jerry Lewis' Return to Big Screen in 'Max Rose' (Exclusive Video)

Cannes: First Look at Jerry Lewis' Return to Big Screen in 'Max Rose' (Exclusive Video)

The Hollywood Reporter provides an exclusive first look at Daniel Noah's new drama Max Rose, which will have its world premiere at the Cannes Film Festival on Thursday evening.

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MAY
15
11 MOS

Cannes Video: Feinberg Picks the Fest's Top Oscar Prospects

Cannes Video: Feinberg Picks the Fest's Top Oscar Prospects

Only a couple of years ago, I was beginning to wonder if the Cannes Film Festival had become virtually irrelevant to the Oscar race. While only two Palme d'Or winners, both released over a half-century ago, have ever gone on to win the best picture Oscar -- The Lost Weekend (1945) and Marty (1955) -- the rest of the lineup, in most years since the fest's founding 67 years ago, has included at least a few titles that went on to strong Oscar showings.

But, heading into 2011, even that was no longer a given. Indeed, only two of the previous 30 best picture Oscar winners had even played at Cannes, Chariots of Fire (1981) and No Country for Old Men (2007), and only one of the previous 14 Palme d'Or winners had even been nominated for the best picture Oscar, The Pianist (2002). As a result of its May dates, Cannes seemed to be losing many top contenders to the Telluride and Toronto film fests, which take place in September, closer to the end of the year, when awards voters fill out their ballots.

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MAY
15
11 MOS

Cannes: First Look at Star-Studded Teaser for 'Seduced and Abandoned' (Exclusive Video)

Cannes: First Look at Star-Studded Teaser for 'Seduced and Abandoned' (Exclusive Video)

The Hollywood Reporter here provides an exclusive first look at James Toback's new documentary Seduced and Abandoned, which will have its world premiere at the Cannes Film Festival on Monday evening.

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MAY
13
11 MOS

Cannes: Festival Vet Reveals 5 Most Anticipated Films (Video)

Cannes: Festival Vet Reveals 5 Most Anticipated Films (Video)

I recently sat down with my friend Didier Allouch, the Hollywood correspondent for the French premium pay television channel Canal+ and a veteran of the last 26 editions of the Cannes Film Festival, and asked him to identify the five films slated for the 2013 fest about which he is most excited.

Didier makes his selections -- which include a black-and-white film, a film without dialogue and a Japanese thriller -- and offers detailed explanations for them.

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MAY
13
11 MOS

Cannes: Fest Vet Shares 11 Tips for First-Time Visitors to Croisette (Video)

Cannes: Fest Vet Shares 11 Tips for First-Time Visitors to Croisette (Video)

I recently had a conversation about the Cannes Film Festival with my friend Didier Allouch, the French-born Hollywood correspondent for the French premium pay television channel Canal+. Didier has covered the last 26 editions of Cannes and will be the only journalist interviewing talent on the red carpet outside of the Palais theater this year, so, as I prepared for my first trip to the famous fest in the south of France, I figured that he was as good a resource to consult as anyone.

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MAY
1
11 MOS

TCM Classic Film Fest: Ann Blyth on 'Mildred Pierce,' Musicals and Slapping Joan Crawford (Video)

TCM Classic Film Fest: Ann Blyth on 'Mildred Pierce,' Musicals and Slapping Joan Crawford (Video)

On Sunday, the last day of the fourth annual TCM Film Festival, I had the great pleasure of spending a bit of time with one of this year's honored guests of the fest, the legendary actress/singer Ann Blyth. The lovely and demure 84-year-old traveled from her home near San Diego to Hollywood for all four days of this year's fest, and many -- including TCM host Robert Osborne -- gushed that it was as special to see her as any of the dozens of Golden Age stars in attendance. Blyth, of course, is best known for her work opposite Joan Crawford in the film noir classic Mildred Pierce (1945), for which she received a best supporting actress Oscar nomination, and in M-G-M musicals of the fifties such as Kismet (1955). She appeared for a special TCM tribute before a screening of the former on Saturday evening and the former on Sunday afternoon before sitting down with me to reflect on her life and career.

(The video at the top of this post contains highlights of our conversation.)

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APR
30
12 MOS

TCM Classic Film Fest: Albert Maysles on Freeing Cameras, Capturing Truths (Video)

TCM Classic Film Fest: Albert Maysles on Freeing Cameras, Capturing Truths (Video)

On Sunday afternoon, I met up in Hollywood with the legendary documentarian Albert Maysles, who was in town to introduce his classic film Salesman (1968) at the fourth annual TCM Film Festival later that day, for a wide-ranging interview about his life and career. (Check out the video at the top of this post for highlights of our conversation.)

Maysles, now 86 and living in Harlem with his wife, is anything but retired; in fact, he is still hard at work on numerous prospective films as well as his nonprofit Maysles Institute and Cinema, which teaches and screens examples of documentary films old and new.

Salesman, which Maysles directed with his younger brother and frequent collaborator David Maysles (who died in 1987), was the first documentary feature of the cinema verite variety, which Maysle and other filmmakers who worked at Time-Life in the early 1960s -- including Robert Drew, D.A. Pennebaker and the late Richard Leacock -- helped to develop. Cinema verite, which is also known as "direct cinema," calls for allowing a film's story to unveil itself rather than trying to influence or structure it, and it was this technique that the Maysles brothers employed in subsequent years on many films including Gimme Shelter (1970) and Grey Gardens (1975), both of which appear near the top of virtually every list of the greatest documentaries of all time.

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APR
30
12 MOS

'Bonnie and Clyde' Writer Says Movies Don't Deserve Blame for Gun Violence (Video)

'Bonnie and Clyde' Writer Says Movies Don't Deserve Blame for Gun Violence (Video)

Last Friday at the TCM Film Festival in Hollywood, I conducted an in-depth interview with the legendary writer-director Robert Benton, a three-time Oscar winner whose first film credit was for co-writing, with David Newman, the now-classic Bonnie and Clyde (1967). In light of the recent gun rampages at a political gathering Tucson, Ariz., a movie theater in Aurora, Colo., and an elementary school in Newtown, Conn., and the fact that some have blamed them, in part, on the depiction of guns in the movies, I asked Benton whether he felt that films like Bonnie and Clyde -- one of the first released after the fall of the industry's longstanding Hays Code of censorship and consequently one of the first to get away with graphically gun violence -- are in any way responsible for tragedies of this sort.

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APR
29
12 MOS

TCM Classic Film Fest: Robert Benton on His Films, Dyslexia and Directing Tricks (Video)

TCM Classic Film Fest: Robert Benton on His Films, Dyslexia and Directing Tricks (Video)

During the fourth annual TCM Classic Film Festival, which just came to a close after running in Hollywood from Thursday through Sunday, I had the opportunity to sit down with one of the festival's special guests, legendary writer-director Robert Benton, for an in-depth interview about his life and career. The 80-year-old, a three-time Oscar winner, is best known as one of the writers of Arthur Penn's Bonnie and Clyde (1967); the writer-director of Kramer vs. Kramer (1979) and Places in the Heart (1984); and as a man whose films tend to be intimate examinations of family and community.

(The video at the top of this post contains highlights of our conversation.)

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APR
26
12 MOS

TCM Classic Film Fest: Mitzi Gaynor on Marilyn, Sinatra and The Beatles (Video)

TCM Classic Film Fest: Mitzi Gaynor on Marilyn, Sinatra and The Beatles (Video)

On Wednesday evening, I had the great pleasure of spending some time with Mitzi Gaynor, the irrepressible actress-singer-dancer whose career began during Hollywood's Golden Age and continues to this day. I met the 81-year-old, who is as sprightly as ever, near the pool at the Hollywood Roosevelt Hotel, where an outdoor screening of South Pacific (1958), the film with which she is most closely associated, followed by a Q&A with its leading lady, subsequently helped to open the fourth annual TCM Classic Film Festival on Thursday night. The fest will continue through Sunday.

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FEB
22
1 years

'The Hollywood Reporters,' Ep. 9: Getting Technical With the Oscars (Video)

'The Hollywood Reporters,' Ep. 9: Getting Technical With the Oscars (Video)

The Hollywood Reporter has released the ninth installment of its weekly web series The Hollywood Reporters. In each episode, THR awards analyst Scott Feinberg, the series' host, chats with colleagues from THR's newsroom about different aspects of the awards race. This week, Feinberg was joined by contributing tech editor Carolyn Giardina for a discussion about the technical Oscars -- among them best cinematography, best film editing, best sound editing, best sound mixing and best visual effects -- and the top contenders to win them this year.

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FEB
21
1 years

A Few Minutes With Feinberg: The Public Performs the Oscar-Nominated Films (Video)

A Few Minutes With Feinberg: The Public Performs the Oscar-Nominated Films (Video)

Thanks for checking out the 19th -- and final pre-Oscars -- episode of A Few Minutes With Feinberg, The Hollywood Reporter’s weekly video series in which I spend -- you guessed it -- a few minutes dissecting the race to the Academy Awards.

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FEB
19
1 years

Steven Spielberg, Daniel Day-Lewis, Sally Field, Tony Kushner on Making 'Lincoln' (Video)

Steven Spielberg, Daniel Day-Lewis, Sally Field, Tony Kushner on Making 'Lincoln' (Video)

Not long ago, I moderated an extensive Q&A following a screening of Lincoln with the film's director Steven Spielberg, screenwriter Tony Kushner, and actors Daniel Day-Lewis, Sally Field, David Strathairn, James Spader and Lee Pace. The Academy nominated Lincoln for best picture, Spielberg for best director, Day-Lewis for best actor, Field for best supporting actress and Kushner for best adapted screenplay. I urge you to check out the video of our conversation above.

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