Leah Remini to Write Scientology Memoir

The 'King of Queens' actress' book will discuss how she was "indoctrinated" into the church and why she chose to leave.
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Leah Remini, the actress who famously quit Scientology, is writing a memoir about her experiences in and out of the church, Random House imprint Ballantine Books announced Thursday.

Troublemaker: Surviving Hollywood and Scientology will publish on Nov. 3. Remini has been quietly writing the book for some time, given the short window between the announcement of the book and publication. Typically publishers announce a book a year out from publication.

In a statement, Ballantine outlined the book:

"In Troublemaker, Remini, best known as the star of the popular long-running sitcom King of Queens, will detail for the first time her life growing up in the Church of Scientology and her rise to fame in Hollywood. Indoctrinated into the church as a child while living with her mother and sister in New York, Remini eventually moved to Los Angeles, where her dreams of becoming an actress and advancing Scientology’s causes grew increasingly intertwined. But when she began to raise questions about some of the church’s actions, she found herself a target, which led to her — and her family’s — break from the church. Bold, brash, and bravely confessional, Troublemaker chronicles Leah Remini’s remarkable journey toward emotional and spiritual freedom, both for herself and for her family."

Remini, who was introduced to Scientology at age 10, left in 2013. THR reported it was over her criticism of the church's treatment of followers and the leadership of David Miscavige, the church head.

She said at the time she was considering writing a memoir, but no project was announced. Remini told BuzzFeed in 2014, “I don’t want to be known as this bitter ex-Scientologist.”

At the time, the church declined to comment on her departure, saying in a statement that it “respects the privacy of parishioners and has no comment about any individual Church member." But other well-known Scientologists were more forthright. On the Howard Stern Show, Kirstie Alley called her a “bigot” for saying she was shunned by former Scientology friends for leaving the church.

Scientology has come under increased scrutiny over the last couple of years because of Lawrence Wright’s best-selling book Going Clear: Scientology, Hollywood, and the Prison of Belief (exclusively excerpted in THR) and the related documentary directed by Alex Gibney.  

Remini was represented by APA on the book deal. Executive editor Pamela Cannon acquired the book for Ballantine. 

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