Lena Dunham Drops Surprise Book Online

The 'Girls' creator pulls a Beyonce with a flash debut of 'Is It Evil Not to Be Sure?' at LennyLetter.
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Imitating Beyonce, whose surprise release of new album Lemonade created a sensation, Girls creator Lena Dunham dropped a new book on her website LennyLetter.com this morning without any advance warning.

Is It Evil Not to be Sure? is a collection of diary entries from Dunham’s journals when she was 19. The 56-page chapbook is being sold in a limited run of 2,000 copies at LennyLetter.com, with all profits going to Girls Write Now. 

On her website, Dunham explained her motivation for the book:

"Earlier this year, recuperating in bed from surgery and feeling painfully adult, I found my journals from 2005/2006 on an old hard drive. I was, of course, full of the kind of mortification that is part and parcel with meeting a former version of yourself, a woefully misguided girl desperate to be embraced by even the least exemplary specimens of young American malehood. But I was also moved by -- maybe even proud of -- how carefully I had recorded that period of time, my younger self's commitment to capturing the kinds of hyper-internal formative moments so often lost to adulthood. I have always believed that women chronicling their own lives, even (or especially) at their most mundane, is a radical act. That's why I thought the diaries might be worth sharing as a short book, with proceeds going to Girls Write Now and their mission to give young women the tools to tell their own stories. I can't think of a more admirable goal for an organization, or a better reason to expose the oft troubling thought patterns of my final teenage year."

The book’s release is timed to the Girls Write Now awards ceremony tonight (May 17). Girls executive producer and LennyLetter co-founder Jenni Konner is one of the four honorees. Founded in 1998, Girls Write Now is a New York City organization dedicated to nurturing and mentoring young female writers, the first of its kind in the U.S. 

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