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New York Fashion Week Spring 2013: Michael Kors Attracts A-Listers

In a season light on celebs, the sportswear king brings out Michael Douglas, Catherine Zeta-Jones, Marisa Tomei and more.

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Michael Kors might be New York's most predictable designer -- and that's not a bad thing. While Marc Jacobs changes his look and style every season -- you never know what you're going to get -- Kors turns out wearable American sportswear in luxe fabrics every season. It always fits well, it's always chic, it's always clean -- and it's always going to look good anywhere in the world. Even while the Toronto Film Festival is going on (another celeb magnet), he always has a well-stocked front row that other designers would kill for. That's right -- every season.

The early celeb arrivers -- in other words, those who want to do interviews and have camera crews all over them -- were Camilla Belle and Katharine McPhee (almost ubiquitous this week). Then The Newsroom's Olivia Munn showed up with an HBO team in tow, wearing a forest green tight knit Kors sheath. "Michael Kors is a fan of The Newsroom," she told THR. "And he asked me to come out. I went into the Beverly Hills store and he'd picked out some dresses for me -- and this was his favorite, as well as mine. I was excited, but Fashion Week can be jarring -- this is kind of a lot," she said, looking around at the aggressive crews and reporters waiting for her.

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"We start shooting season two in November," Munn noted. "And I'm so excited by the language that I study the scripts like a schoolgirl. It's so fun to break down Aaron Sorkin's scripts, and we're all looking forward to go back to work."

Belle wore a new Kors black and white windowpane style from the spring 2013 collection -- the true sign of a fashionista. She came to New York to take in some of the U.S. Open, and a little bit of Fashion Week -- a good balance. And probably a little shopping, too.

Marisa Tomei had just returned from TIFF, where she was promoting the new indie Inescapable, in which she plays a Syrian woman, and the doc Love, Marilyn, in which she read excerpts of Marilyn Monroe's diaries.. And her next move? "Redecorating my place in New York," she laughed. "The people helping me can't believe how involved I am -- but it's really relaxing for me to use the visual side of the brain, and not think about words. I'm really enjoying it." As for Kors, "we've become friends; he's a lovely guy and I really like his clothes."

Michael Douglas and Catherine Zeta-Jones arrived before the runway show began, followed by all the camera crews. They gave a few brief words to TV and print reporters -- essentially, Zeta-Jones saying, "Michael Kors is a good friend of my husband and myself. A lovely man who makes terrific wearable clothes." Reporters tried to corner Douglas about his new role as Liberace (for an HBO movie produced by Jerry Weintraub), but he dodged all those queries. The project is definitely under a shroud of secrecy, led by its director Steven Soderbergh.

Kors' spring collection was along the lines of what Jacobs showed on Monday night: black and white stripes, a more streamlined attitude, A-line skirts and clean, clear colors. His program notes read: "Geometric glamour - graphic stripes - optical checks - sharp tailoring - the leggy suit - crisp navy white and crimson - black and white - metallic and lucite accents on streamlined shoes - architectural polish." In other words, a nod to the early sixties and the early seventies.

Meanwhile, what will Hollywood's take away be? The gowns at the end of the show were clingy and all made in black double face crepe -- and all of them had keyholes and architectural cut-outs, some in front and a lot in back, that were reminiscent of the attention-getting black Prabal Gurung dress Rooney Mara stepped out in last awards season. So in the Kors eyeview, gowns will be clingy, black, scuba-like, no frills -- and definitely a bit sexy.

 

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