'Ant-Man' Director Reveals Movie's Discarded Original Opening and Closing Scenes

Bad news for Hank Pym, good news for fans of Martin Donovan.
Marvel/Screenshot

For a movie with such tumultuous origins — including the loss of its original director weeks before the original start date, and a screenplay reworked a number of times — it's no surprise that Ant-Man went through a number of iterations before arriving at the version in theaters right now. In recent interviews, director Peyton Reed has revealed alternate opening and closing scenes intended for the movie.

In a conversation with CinemaBlend, Reed talked about the original ending for the movie, which would have tied up a loose end that was ultimately decided to be left dangling. "At the end of the movie, [Hydra agent Mitchell Carson, played by Martin Donovan] gets away and has these Cross particles, and there was a sequence where Ant-Man has an encounter with him," Reed said. "For a couple reasons, it felt like maybe we should leave those particles out there. In that original thing, he took Martin Donovan out and got the particles."

Laying the groundwork for a potential sequel, perhaps? Reed also revealed that an earlier opening for the movie was shot, but ultimately discarded, set in the period where Michael Douglas's character was active as the first Ant-Man.

"It was basically a stand-alone sequence where you really did not see it was Hank Pym," Reed said. "He was retrieving some microfilm from this originally Cuban general and then it became a Panamanian general. … It really was designed in those early drafts to be almost like a Bond movie stand-alone scene in the beginning. It was going to show the powers. You never saw Ant-Man, it almost felt like an Invisible Man sequence, and it’s really, really cool."

The sequence was cut, the director said, because it felt "tonally disconnected from the movie we were making and story-wise." But, he added, "We actually talked at one point about releasing [it] like a stand-alone [short]: Hank Pym as Ant-Man. Who knows if that will still happen."

These two sequences weren't the only ones ultimately discarded from the finished feature. Talking to THR, editor Dan Lebental talked about an excised wish-fulfillment sequence that was "a little silly" for the movie.

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