Even 'Empire Strikes Back' Writer Has No Clue What 'Star Wars' Canon Means

"I don't know what the canon is. I cannot get that straight," Lawrence Kasdan admits.
20th Century Fox
'Empire Strikes Back'

If you have no idea what it meant for Lucasfilm to re-set Star Wars canon last year ahead of the release of Star Wars: The Force Awakens, then you can rest assured that you're in fine company. In a new interview, Force Awakens co-writer Lawrence Kasdan admits that the canon "has zero meaning to me."

Talking to the Los Angeles Times, Kasdan said that "everyone refers to the canon, but it has zero meaning to me. I don't know what the canon is. I cannot get that straight." He adds, "I've written four Star Wars movies now, and I don't know what the canon is."

Lucasfilm formalized its definition of the Star Wars canon in April 2014, officially excluding anything made before that point beyond the original six movies and Star Wars: The Clone Wars animated series.

All ancillary projects produced since then and not marked with the Star Wars Legends banner — i.e., Del Rey's prose novels, Marvel's new line of comic books and the Disney XD animated series Star Wars: Rebelshave been counted as canonical. (You can see why Kasdan might be confused.)

Kasdan shouldn't be too worried, however; not only does The Force Awakens set the tone for the Star Wars mythology moving forward, but his next — and, he's said, final — Star Wars project is a flashback story set in the past of Harrison Ford's Han Solo.

Opening up about that project to the Times, he said that the project was "fun because you have to imagine him 10 years earlier [than his debut in 1977's Star Wars] in his early 20s. What was his like before he hardened up? Before he had some setbacks? Before he put on this cynical coat? What got him there?"

Of course, he'll have to deal with the fact that Han Solo was apparently married when he was younger, according to the now-canonical comic books ...

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