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JUN
9
5 MOS

Sundance Title 'A Girl Walks Home Alone at Night' Gets North American Distribution

Kino Lorber will release the world’s first “Iranian Vampire Western," which was produced by Elijah Wood.

A Girl Walks Home Alone At Night Sundance Film Still - H 2014
"A Girl Walks Home Alone at Night"

Kino Lorber has picked up North American distribution rights to Sundance title A Girl Walks Home Alone at Night.

Described as the world’s first “Iranian Vampire Western," A Girl Walks Home Alone at Night marks the feature film directorial debut of Ana Lily Amirpour. The black-and-white vampire film, which served as the opening night event at the New Directors/New Films, programmed by MoMA and the Film Society of Lincoln Center, stars Sheila Vand, Arash Marandi and Dominic Rains.

PHOTOS: The Scene at Sundance Film Festival 2014

Kino Lorber is planning a theatrical release for the film in October 2014, followed by a digital and home entertainment release early next year.

This deal was negotiated between Kino Lorber CEO Richard Lorber and Cinetic Media on behalf of the filmmakers.

“This stunning and stinging cinematic marvel left us speechless at its premiere,” said Lorber in a statement. “We dream of finding visionary films that peel away the gauze, as Ana Lily does with rare originality in this unprecedented work. When we unleash her fang-bearing Girl on cinema screens across North America, audiences will see as never before how the undead truly come alive.”

The film was produced by Amirpour, Sina Sayyah and Justin Begnaud and executive produced by Black Light District (founded by Reza Sixo Safai and Daniel Grove), Logan Pictures and SpectreVision, the production company founded by Elijah Wood, Daniel Noah and Josh C. Waller.

At Sundance, THR's critic wrote of the film: "Beguiling in its strangeness, yet also effortlessly evoking recognizable emotions such as loneliness and the feeling of being stuck in a dead-end town and life, this moody and gorgeous film is finally more about atmosphere and emotions than narrative -- and none the worse for it."