'Wonder Woman': What You Need to Know Before Seeing the Prequel

Wonder Woman heads into theaters this weekend, bringing an already critically acclaimed new superhero to the masses, following her debut in Batman v. Superman: Dawn of Justice. But just because it's her first solo feature doesn't mean that audiences should to go into the theater unprepared. Here's what you might want to know before heading to the multiplex this weekend.

How does Wonder Woman connect to the other DC movies?

The first time movie audiences met Gal Gadot's Wonder Woman was in last year's Batman v. Superman, in which she stole the show from under the noses of Bruce Wayne (Ben Affleck) and Clark Kent (Henry Cavill). So, does that mean Wonder Woman is a follow-up? Well, no — it's actually a prequel of sorts, taking place roughly a century earlier, as Wonder Woman comes to "Man's World" for the first time during World War I. The follow-up to BvS is actually this November, when Zack Snyder's Justice League reaches theaters. But there are a few small nods to BvS in Wonder Woman. And BvS does tease out events of Wonder Woman, in a roundabout fashion; the photo of Wonder Woman alongside a group of men, as seen by Batman is, essentially, the heroes of this movie. But whatever happened to them after that photo was taken …?

So, is this the mother of the Wonder Woman in the other movies, or what?

Even though this movie is set almost 100 years before BvS, that's still the same Wonder Woman in both. No, she doesn't have access to a time machine, nor own the best face cream that retards the effects of aging. She's actually an Amazon, which means that she ages far slower than the average person. (That's also what explains her increased strength and other superhuman abilities, in case you were wondering. Well, that and blessings and costuming from mythical deities, but we all have those, right … ?

Who are these Amazons, anyway?

The easiest way to explain the Amazons is to describe them as a race of superwomen who live on their own island, entirely separate from the male gender. As a result, it's called Paradise Island. (That only seems like a joke; it really is commonly known as Paradise Island in the comics.) Their comic book origins have varied, but what's important to know is that the Amazons have a connection with their deities that goes beyond simple worship. Indeed, their gods have been known to interact with them directly, which explains some of Wonder Woman's most fantastic abilities.

Who Is Steve Trevor?

As Lois Lane is to Superman, so Steve Trevor is to Wonder Woman. As much sidekick as love interest, military man Trevor (played by Chris Pine in the new movie) has the added benefit of being the inciting incident in Wonder Woman's origin, thanks to accidentally breaking the rules and showing up on Paradise Island uninvited, only to reveal what's happening out in the rest of the world. Without Steve Trevor, there wouldn't even be a Wonder Woman … although that doesn't mean she can't operate just as well without him. After all, he wasn't anywhere around in Batman v. Superman: Dawn of Justice when she helped save the day …

Do I need to wait around for a post-credit sequence?

No, Guardians of the Galaxy Vol. 2 used them all up for awhile. There's nothing but the names of the brave women and men responsible for the movie awaiting you once the credits start to roll. Stick around for that anyway. They put a lot of effort into their work.

Is Wonder Woman still, in the lyrics of the theme song from the 1970s show, "In [her] satin tights/fighting for our rights"?

Modesty restricts from speculating on Wonder Woman's hosiery, but it should be considered that, as catchy as the '70s theme song was —

— she does have a much more … metal theme these days:

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