Critics' Picks: 5 Best Films From Outfest 2016

11:00 AM 7/20/2016

by THR Staff

THR's critics pick the must-see standouts from L.A.'s timelier-than-ever LGBT film festival, which ended July 17.

Melissa Moseley/HBO
  1. 1
    5

    Being 17

    Courtesy of Luc Roux

    This quiet stunner from French filmmaker Andre Techine, an intimate epic about the awakening of gay adolescent desire and self-knowledge, revolves around two high schoolers (the terrific Kacey Mottet Klein and Corentin Fila) who navigate an eruption of confused feelings for each other. The drama builds to a final act of searing poignancy. — David Rooney

    Read the full review.

  2. 2
    5

    Looking: The Movie

    Melissa Moseley/HBO

    HBO’s woefully underloved series about a trio of gay men stumbling through crises of love, work and friendship in San Francisco gets a stirring 85-minute sendoff (airing July 23). Anchored by brilliant lead Jonathan Groff and directed by Andrew Haigh, it’s a richer, more authentic glimpse of contemporary LGBT life than most viewers will have had. — Jon Frosch

    Read the full review.

  3. 3
    5

    Kiki

    Courtesy of Sundance Institute

    Swedish filmmaker Sara Jordeno’s eloquent documentary about New York City’s drag and voguing scene surveys the lives of LGBT youth of color at a time when Black Lives Matter and trans rights are making front-page headlines. It’s vibrant fun but also innately and urgently political. — D.R.

    Read the full review.

  4. 4
    5

    AWOL

    Courtesy of Tribeca Film Festival

    A lesbian teen (Lola Kirke) falls for an older woman in Deb Shoval’s lovely, sensitive indie. Coming off a breakthrough in 2015’s Mistress America, Kirke delivers a quietly winning performance that brings out the universal-ity of her character’s challenging first-love plight. — John DeFore

    Read the full review.

  5. 5
    5

    Closet Monster

    Courtesy of Fortissimo Films

    A gay teen’s self-loathing attacks the body as well as the brain in Canadian Stephen Dunn’s confidently made, excitingly odd feature debut, which interweaves coming-of-age themes, bouts of Cronenberg-ian horror and scenes of a hamster voiced by Isabella Rossellini. — Harry Windsor

    Read the full review.

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