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Ann Coulter, Warren Buffett Among Unlikely 'Breaking Bad' Fans

The conservative author says the final episode "shows the importance of having a gun in the home," while the business magnate also tweets (for only the fourth time ever) about the concluding AMC series.

Breaking Bad Series Finale Cranston Skinny Pete in Car - H 2013
AMC
"Breaking Bad"

Many fans said farewell to Breaking Bad as the AMC hit series aired its final episode Sunday. Not only did the series find fans in Hollywood's biggest names, but the show also cultivated a following from some unlikely celebrity viewers. See below for The Hollywood Reporter's roundup of a few of the most surprising Breaking Bad fans.

PHOTOS: 'Breaking Bad' Finale at Hollywood Forever Cemetery 

Ann Coulter, a conservative columnist who has been known to advocate for more guns, offered her takeaway from the Breaking Bad finale.

PBS personality Charlie Rose -- who made a surprise cameo in the show's penultimate episode -- admitted in an interview that he binged-watched five seasons in about two weekends in order to prepare for the role. The episode's director Peter Gould later told THR that Rose's scene was the only one not shot in New Mexico.

Meanwhile, Rose's CBS This Morning co-host, Gayle King, shared a photo of the two of them enjoying the final episode together and joking about it being their first "date."

PHOTOS: 'Breaking Bad': Stars Look Back at 5 Seasons of Acclaimed TV 

Warren Buffett, who has only tweeted four times since creating his Twitter account on May 2, took to social media to write, "Not even the Oracle knows what will happen tonight. #waltsuccessor." Attached was a photo of the billionaire business magnate sporting a Walter White-like goatee and hat that read "honorary Heisenberg," a nod to the character's dark alter ego.

Prolific novelist Joyce Carol Oates compared Walter White (Bryan Cranston) to classic American literary heroes like Mark Twain's Huckleberry Finn and F. Scott Fitzgerald's Jay Gatsby. Oates also expressed surprise that an expected storyline, reminiscent of John Boyne's book The Boy in the Striped Pyjamas, never materialized.