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21
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'Fargo' Season 2 Moves to the '70s, Bringing Back at Least One Character

Executive producers Noah Hawley and Warren Littlefield, enjoying something of a victory lap after the renewal and 18 Emmy nominations, reveal that the events of their follow-up have already been teased.

Keith Carradine Fargo - H 2014
Matthias Clamer/FX
Keith Carradine in "Fargo"

A rare example of instant gratification: Producers of FX's Fargo outlined details of the miniseries' 2015 return just a few hours after the network picked it up for another season.

Noah Hawley and Warren Littlefield appeared at the Television Critics Association on Monday evening — and though it's too early to say too much on Fargo's return, what they did say gave away the time period, locale and even one character: Keith Carradine's Lou Solverson.

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No, Carradine will not be reprising the role. Instead, the show will cast a younger man to revisit the 1979 Sioux Falls incident referenced in "A Fox, a Rabbit, and a Cabbage" when Molly's (Allison Tolman) father was still a state trooper. Action in the season, according to Hawley, will take place in Fargo, N.D., Sioux Falls, S.D., and Luverne, Minn.

"I spoke to Allison Tolman this morning and told her that unless she can channel her four-year-old self, we wouldn't be able to have her in season two," said Hawley, insisting that no cast would be returning. "Lou [is now] a 33-year-old man, recently back from Vietnam. We would meet Molly's mother, and we may learn what happened to her."

With a scheduled shoot from January through May, Fargo will likely return in the fall — and some of the trademark snow may be absent.

"I think going forward it would be fun to start in a wintry environment and change over the course of the season," said Hawley. "That region is a character in the show. That's part of the personality."

Speaking of personality, there will likely be a slight shift in the Coen Brothers' sensibility. Hawley said that the tone of his original source material also is shifting: "If the first season, the three [influences] were Fargo, No Country Old Men and A Serious Man, this year we are in Fargo, Miller's Crossing and The Man Who Wasn't There."