'Inside Amy Schumer': What Happens When POTUS Gets Her Period?

Thursday's episode also skewered TMZ (with help from Patton Oswalt as boss Harvey Levin) and saw a Lena Dunham cameo while Schumer hunted for clothes in a size 12.
Comedy Central
'Inside Amy Schumer'

Is America ready for a female president?

It's a question being asked during this year's election cycle and Amy Schumer, a Hillary Clinton supporter, is clearly sick of hearing it.

On Thursday's episode of Comedy Central's Inside Amy Schumer, the comedian summed up the most stereotypical fears of a woman being elected president with one sketch. In "Madame President," President Schinton (Schumer) wakes up on the first day of her new job as the first female president of the United States only to discover the worst: She got her period.

Throughout the day, President Schinton begins to unravel.

During an emergency meeting, she tells her White House staff that she has epic cramps and that her "mind is mush" before she mistakes Iran for Iraq. She then loses her nerve when someone eats the last chocolate and later, she lounges in the situation room in her pajamas with a heating pad and a face that screams pain. 

"Can we take five? I have not changed my tampon and it is leaking," she asks, before a secret operation to take out "Adele Dazeem" fails. But when her Cabinet begins to scold her, she launches into a menstrual-induced meltdown that scares them into submission.

"Stop yelling at me! Why are you being so mean?! You guys, I can't be president because I got my period!" she screams, into a tampon. "Does anyone have anything to say to me? Like, maybe an 'I'm sorry,' and, 'You're my president'?"

"Your hair looks good," stumbles Reg E. Cathey. 

The short film takes cues from presidential shows such as Madame Secretary and Veep, even seeing cameos from Homeland's F. Murray Abraham and House of Cards' Cathey. (Kudos to Freddy Hayes for making his way into a situation room — take that, President Frank Underwood.)

The clip ends with a newspaper headline that reads, "Is President Schinton Plus Size?" — a clear reference to when Glamour included Schumer in their plus-size issue earlier this year. (Watch the sketch in the full episode, posted here.)

Sizeism remains a theme throughout the episode, as evidenced in a later sketch, "Size 12," that features Lena Dunham. While searching for a shirt in her size, Schumer is shamed by a horrendous saleswoman for asking if she has anything larger than a size zero.

“Could you keep your voice down? You’re scaring the thinner customers," she's told.

Schumer is then transported to a very remote shopping section for people her size. Quite literally put out to pasture, she finds Dunham and a cow named Daisy in a field where she selects a tarp to help cover her "problem areas."

Elsewhere in the episode, Schumer skewers TMZ and their daily celebrity gossip TV show, TMZ Live. A slew of guest stars come together for the sketch, "AMZ": Patton Oswalt takes on the role of TMZ boss Harvey Levin, while Tim Meadows joins Schumer as one of the reporters. (The staff also includes a cockroach and a "piece of shit.")

"Who's fat, who's gross, who's least, who's most?" asks Oswalt to his staff.

After going through videos of their paparazzi following around Amber Tamblyn, Anthony Bourdain and Justin Long — who also appear — they morph into flesh-eating villains. 

Fame, considering the Trainwreck writer and star's massive rise over the last year, was a topic that Schumer and fellow co-creator and executive producer Dan Powell wanted to tackle going into season four.

"There are a couple sketches this season where Amy does comment on some things she's starting to learn about fame and maybe the darker side of fame," Powell told The Hollywood Reporter. "We don't hit on it too much, because we know that's not a universal experience, but it's something Amy's been experiencing and she wanted to comment on it."

Message delivered. 

Inside Amy Schumer airs Thursdays at 10 p.m. ET/PT on Comedy Central.

Photos: Courtesy of Comedy Central

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