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OCT
9
2 YEARS

J.J. Abrams Sells Guide to 'Adulting' Comedy to Fox

The project, which is being written by "The Vow's" Abby Kohn and Marc Silverstein, is based on Kelly Williams Brown's upcoming book, "Adulting: How to Become a Grown-Up in 387 Easy(ish) Steps."

J.J. Abrams Portrait Austin Hargrave - H 2012
Austin Hargrave
J.J. Abrams

J.J. Abrams is venturing into comedy.

In a competitive situation, the Lost producer has garnered a put-pilot commitment from Fox for his single-camera half-hour, Adulting. The project is based on blogger-turned-author Kelly Williams Brown's upcoming book, Adulting: How to Become a Grown-Up in 387 Easy(ish) Steps, which is billed as a hilarious guide to all the things that young adults think they should know already -- but don't. Among the steps on Brown's companion blog: "Do Not Act Like an A--hole Anonymously" and "Facebook Is Not a Good Place to Say Serious Things."

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Feature scribes Abby Kohn and Marc Silverstein (The Vow, Valentine's Day) are on board to write and executive produce the comedy, with Abrams and his partner Bryan Burk attached as exec producers. Bad Robot's Kathy Lingg will co-EP, with Athena Wickham involved as a producer.

The project is set up at Abrams' Bad Robot Productions in association with Warner Bros. TV, where Abrams recently extended his long-term TV deal through 2015. Already this development season, he has sold a futuristic cop drama to Fox and a high-concept drama to NBC. His latest on-air effort, Revolution, was recently granted a full-season order by NBC.

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Venturing outside of the genre world has been a desire of Abrams. When he sat down in September for The Hollywood Reporter's Emmy icons package, he said the series he missed writing for the most was Felicity. "I miss writing for a show that doesn't have any sort of odd, almost sci-fi bend to it," he told THR at the time, noting the challenge of having to come up with stories for a series that had neither high stakes nor a bad guy. "It was just sort of pure romantic, sweet characters who had crushes on one another and were dealing with which party to go to and if they had a part-time job or not. Stuff that was kind of fun to write about."

Kohn and Silverstein, longtime rom-com writing partners, are repped by CAA, Management 360 and Sloane Offer; Abrams is repped by CAA, Oasis and Jackoway Tyerman; Brown is repped by UTA and Foundry Literary and Media.

Email: Lacey.Rose@THR.com; Twitter: @LaceyVRose