Jon Stewart and Bill O'Reilly Get Into Shouting Match Over "White Privilege"

Things got heated on 'The Daily Show'
Comedy Central / Screengrab

Jon Stewart and Bill O'Reilly sure know how to disagree.

At times the pair shouted while debating the notion of white privilege (Stewart believes it exists, while O'Reilly doesn't) during a wild Daily Show segment.

"If there's white privilege, there has to be Asian privilege, because Asians make more money than whites," O'Reilly said.

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Stewart got personal, arguing that while O'Reilly grew up under modest circumstances, he benefited by living in Levittown, New York, where G.I.'s were able to get homes at affordable prices. At the time, African-Americans were not allowed to live in O'Reilly's neighborhood, and Stewart said the Fox News host received a stable upbringing in a place that instilled values — while the children of African-American G.I.'s were not given that same opportunity.

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"That was in 1950! Alright? 1950!" O'Reilly shouted, saying it was "unfair" African-Americans were barred from the neighborhood, but adding there were plenty of black neighborhoods that built values.

O'Reilly said he was going to repeat something he'd already stated — and do so slow enough that even Stewart would understand.

"America is now a place where if you work hard, get educated and are an honest person, you can succeed," O'Reilly said.

Stewart, his voice rising, countered: "If you live in a neighborhood where poverty is endemic, it's harder to work hard. It's harder to get an education."

Stewart closed by making a The O'Reilly Factor reference.

"I'll call it this, and I think it's a word you'll understand. It's a factor,' " Stewart said of the role race plays in one's opportunities.

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O'Reilly conceded with a smile, saying "It's a factor. I'll give you that."

The conversation — as it aired — ended with a hasty edit, and after a commercial break Stewart said the segment had gone long. He added that he knew he wasn't "the ideal advocate" for the conversation he'd just had, but said, "Wow, that's f—king fun."

See the epic showdown below. 

Email: Aaron.Couch@THR.com
Twitter: @AaronCouch

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