'Key & Peele,' 'Workaholics' Stars on Controversial Scenes, Future of Their Shows

Talent behind 'Broad City,' 'The Review' and 'Kroll Show' also took the stage at Paleyfest.
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Nine Comedy Central all-stars took Paleyfest by storm Saturday — and plenty of f-bombs and behind-the-scenes stories ensued.

Paleyfest's Salute to Comedy Central panel included Key & Peele's Keegan-Michael Key and Jordan PeeleWorkaholicsBlake Anderson, Adam DeVine, Anders Holm, and Kyle Newacheck; Kroll Show's Nick Kroll; Broad City's Abbi Jacobson; and Review's Andy Daly.

The panel took plenty of detours as the stars riffed among themselves, tackled controversial sketches, and talked about the best (and worst) notes they'd received from Comedy Central.

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Asked about their most dangerous sketch ever, Key recalled a 2013 L.A. Vice sketch in which they blew up a car — necessitating that he be closer to the blast than anyone else on the crew.

"They said to me 'you got to be here for this shot. The rest of us go over there,' " said Key, who was teased by his peers throughout the panel, with Kroll and the Workaholics guys all talking about how they invited his comedy partner Peele to appear on their shows — but not him.

Daly, whose review is based on an Australian show, jokingly became angry when moderator Andy Greenwald brought up that fact, saying he wanted to get credit for the show.  

Though Comedy Central is famously hands off (they didn't even read scripts for the first season of Workaholics, according to its stars), the network asked Key and Peele early on to consider cutting down on their Star Wars-themed sketches in season one.

That revelation sparked a minor eruption from the Workaholics guys' corner of the panel stage. They have a strict "no Star Wars" rule on their show, with Holm joking that the series "ages you up."

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Kroll pitched a sketch called "Cake Train" for the Kroll Show pilot. The sketch would show a baker tossing cakes from the back of a train and into the mouths of people running after it.

"We were told it would be the most expensive thing to do on the show," said Kroll, who tabled the sketch for a later season. It made it through for season two because Comedy Central didn't look closely at the scripts.

"It doesn't make sense with the rest of my show at all, but the they let us do it by not having very stern oversight," said Kroll of the sketch, which starred Zach Galifianakis.

Some of the most buzzed-about Broad City moments came in February's "The Matrix," in which Ilana (Ilana Glazer) has sex with a tree. It wasn't in the script, so the network didn't know about it ahead of time.

"At the show when we write it, we really want it to deal with important issues," Joked Jacobson. After the cut went to the network, it sent a note asking what the scene was all about — but ultimately didn't ask for any changes.

The Workaholics guys said an episode about creating an unburnable American flag (which necessitated their characters burning dozens of flags on screen to perfect the process) was rejected one season, but got through without protest for season three. As for how long the shows might go, Anderson said they thought the show would become funnier and funnier as they aged — and the characters became "more pathetic."

DeVine  added: "We've said we want to do a few more seasons, and they take a break for 15 years and come back when we're nearing fifty."

Email: Aaron.Couch@THR.com
Twitter: @AaronCouch 

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