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NOV
1
8 MOS

Lifetime Cancels 'The Client List'

UPDATED: The Jennifer Love Hewitt drama wrapped its sophomore run in June.

The Client List Jennifer Love Hewitt 4/21 Still - H 2013
Michael Desmond/Lifetime
"The Client List"

Lifetime has canceled The Client List, The Hollywood Reporter confirms.

The Jennifer Love Hewitt-toplined drama finished its sophomore run in June. The Client List, produced by Sony Pictures TV, followed Riley Parks (Hewitt) as she balanced being a single mother and working as a massage therapist.

The decision to not move forward with the drama comes after lengthy negotiations with star/executive producer Hewitt.

The actress had been in talks with producers about the creative direction of the series. Hewitt is engaged to co-star Brian Hallisay and wanted their real-life relationship and pregnancy written into the show. Hallisay started as a recurring character and was ultimately promoted to regular in season two.

STORY: 'Client List' Producers Preview Big Turning Point: Riley 'Changes Forever'

Sources say the actress' vision did not gel with what producers had in mind. Lifetime declined comment.

The Client List's cancellation comes as the female-skewing cable network recently axed its longest-running original scripted drama, Army Wives, after seven seasons. The network recently renewed Drop Dead Diva for a sixth season after temporarily canceling the drama after its fourth season. Devious Maids will return for a second season, and Lifetime will likely renew freshman drama Witches of East End.

On the development side, Lifetime is prepping Nicholas Sparks' two-hour backdoor pilot Deliverance Creek and dramas HR, The Lottery and Unreal. Meanwhile, Hewitt is developing a modern-day Pride & Prejudice at Lifetime under her overall development deal with the network, which she inked in 2011.

Though The Client List movie was a ratings boon for Lifetime, pulling in 3.9 million viewers in 2010, the series never matched the telepic. The first season enjoyed more robust numbers, debuting to 2.8 million viewers. But the sophomore run dipped and ultimately wrapped with 2.1 million viewers and a more troubling 0.7 rating with adults 18-49.

Michael O'Connell contributed to this report.