Mario Van Peebles Drama 'Superstition' Scores Syfy Series Order

The 13-episode straight-to-series drama hails from XLrator's Barry Gordon.
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Mario Van Peebles

Syfy is set to explore some superstitions.

The NBCUniversal-owned cable network has handed out a straight-to-series pickup for Mario Van Peebles' drama Superstition, The Hollywood Reporter has learned.

The 13-episode series, set to begin production in early 2017 for a premiere later in the year, centers around the Mosley family, owners of the only funeral home in a fictitious town on the outskirts of New Orleans and keepers of the town’s dark secrets and history. Known for its haunted houses, elevated graveyards, odd townsfolk and rich history of unusual phenomena, the town is also a “landing patch” for the world’s darkest manifestations of fear, guided into the world by an ancient, mysterious malefactor named The Dredge.

Superstition hails from XLrator Media's Barry Gordon and MVPTV's Van Peebles, who will also write, direct and star in some of the episodes. Joel Anderson Thompson (Battlestar Galactica) is set as showrunner, with Laurence Andries (Alias, Six Feet Under) also on board as an executive producer. Duo Brusta Brown and John Mitchell Todd (Defiance) will write. Gordon's independent film distribution company XLrator Media holds international distribution and sales rights.

"A town where all superstitions, myths and legends are true offers a rich cultural, atmospheric and macabre playground for Mario Van Peebles, Barry Gordon, Joel Anderson Thompson and Laurence Andries to explore. We are excited to work with this terrific team and look forward to bringing this unique story to Syfy,” Syfy senior vp, programming Chris Regina said Tuesday in a statement.

Superstition becomes Syfy's latest co-production, alongside series like Van Helsing, Dark Matter and Wynonna Earp. The drama joins a roster of programming that also includes 12 Monkeys, The Expanse, Incorporated, The Magicians and Z Nation as Syfy continues to double down on traditional science-fiction fare.

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