Thomas Gibson's 'Criminal Minds' Co-Star Cites "Karma" in Deleted Video

"Lot of birdies chirping out there; the gossip is real," he said in the video.
Photofest
Thomas Gibson (center) and Shemar Moore (right) on 'Criminal Minds'

Criminal Minds alum Shemar Moore seems to have weighed in on the firing of his former co-star Thomas Gibson.

In a video recently posted on Moore's Instagram and quickly deleted, the actor took an indirect jab at Gibson in which he implied the fired star got what he deserved.

"Lot of birdies chirping out there; the gossip is real," Moore said in the video. "I hear it. I see it. I'm sure a lot of you do, too, so I'll just say this: I believe in karma. Good things happen to good people. Honest people. Hard-working people. Humble people. People who believe in basic goodness. People who believe in themselves. People who believe in others. Good things will happen to you; it's not always easy; but you gotta grind it out and you gotta believe in you. Treat people how you expect them to treat you. Celebrate yourself; celebrate your blessings — as you should. But just know that you're not better than anybody. We all have our own gifts, so unwrap them bad boys and show 'em off. But then appreciate other people's gifts. Church is over."

Moore and Gibson co-starred on the CBS drama for 11 seasons before Moore decided to exit the drama last season and was subsequently written out of the series. Sources tell The Hollywood Reporter that Moore had a contentious relationship with Gibson, who tightly scheduled his duties on Criminal Minds so he could fly home to his family in San Antonio and often was upset by Moore showing up late to work.

Gibson was fired from Criminal Minds on Friday after allegedly kicking writer-producer Virgil Williams in the shins during an on-set argument more than two weeks ago. Gibson, who was directing an episode written by Williams, is said to have disagreed with Williams about a creative choice and the argument escalated to a physical fight. (A source close to Gibson describes his actions as "self-defense" because Williams trains as a boxer, but other sources say Williams is known to be a non-aggressive presence on the set and is small in stature and often wears a bow tie and blazer to work.) The incident was witnessed by several Criminal Minds producers, including showrunner Erica Messer. Gibson has since hired a top Los Angeles law firm to pursue possible legal claims against the show's producers, ABC Studios and CBS Television Studios.

Watch the video below. 

comments powered by Disqus