10 Things You Need to Know About the Golden Globe Awards


With the red-carpet ready for Sunday's big show, some insider pointers:

1. The room is full of hungry stars. Waiters remove all the food before 5 pm regardless of whether the stars make it to their tables to eat. The production does not want the sound of knives and forks clacking in the background of the show or people with potatoes hanging out of their mouth on camera. Consequently stars in 'the pit' -- the front area most coveted and packed with A-listers -- is full of people trying to get small plates of foods from the back delivered to them discreetly during the show.

2. It's really, really loud inside the ballroom. That's the one thing everyone mentions when they leave -- how the crowd talks throughout the telecast – commercial breaks, during presentations and acceptances. The loudest is in the back of the room where guests get up, mingle and stand against the wall. Security guards are posted in the back to "shush" people but its a full time job and they aren't very successful. The sound engineer who manages to keep the extraneous noise out of the telecast deserves an Emmy.

3. The Golden Globes has an annual Hollywood debutante moment thanks to its Miss Golden Globe honoree -- usually the offspring of a famous celebrity. Their task is to assist onstage during the awards show. Many honorees have gone onto great things such as Linda Evans (1964), Anne Archer (1971), Melanie Griffith (1975), Laura Dern (1982). Rumer Willis was 2009. This year, it's Joe Mantegna's daughter Gia Mantegna.

4. There are very few agents in the ballroom. The Foreign Press cares only about having stars in the room. "Stars giving stars awards" is their bottom-line for the show – no technical awards, no singing, no dancing. Their attitude is, "If the stars want their agents to be there, they can give them one of their own tickets." You can imagine the joy this brings to the world of representation.

5. The ballroom has what every other award show desperately (for some) lacks: an easily accessible smoking area. It's out the multi-door fire exits in the back overlooking the pool. This is where they should have a camera. It's the loosest scene of the night. Anyone who's restless, bored, or just needs a breath of air, hangs out. It's also "the" place to network during the show.

6. Nobody says the Globes are more prestigious, or voted upon by a more qualified electorate, than the Oscars. But there's one area where the HFPA might outshine AMPAS: best foreign- language film. Chalk it up to their being foreigners themselves, but they make consistently intelligent choices in this category. There's no The Tourist in these nominees.

7. The awards is steeped in a rowdy tradition. The awards were handed out by journalists in the HFPA up until 1958, when Frank Sinatra, Dean Martin, and Sammy Davis Jr. famously stormed the stage with whiskeys and cigarettes and took over the show, distributing the awards. Since then, stars have ruled the show.

8. The show patrons continue to enjoy their drink. It is the most spirited of the major award shows. Some 9000 glasses of Moet & Chandon champagne will be drunk Sunday. One thousand Moet minis will be served on the red carpet and leading into the ballroom. In the ballroom, all magnums are pre-prepped so that they are popped and chilled in ice buckets on the table.

9. The restrooms loom large at the Globes (see previous item). In 1998 Christine Lahti of Chicago Hope almost missed accepting her award because she was in the loo (see the clip here). The ladies room has a complete room with L'Oreal makeup artists to give everyone touch-ups and offer makeup samples -- even the A-list stars grab handfuls of lip gloss, etc. The men just have a bathroom attendant with cologne top-ups.

10. The show generally does not have a host, getting rid of the concept in the mid-90s because they felt it was already star-studded enough. Ricky Gervais was the first host since 1995 last year. And he will continue his duties once again this year.

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