A November To-Do List for Film Buffs in Los Angeles

Courtesy of Carlotta Films US

Who needs 'Hunger Games' when you've got vintage Varda, rare Rivette and other odd and classic gems playing on big screens around Los Angeles?

JACQUES RIVETTE’S 13-HOUR NEW WAVE MASTERPIECE AT CINEFAMILY611 N. FAIRFAX AVE.
 
Less than six months after enthusing about the unlikely appearance of Jacques Rivette’s Duelle at Cinefamily, an even rarer work by the French new wave master is taking over the same venue for an entire weekend in mid-November. On Nov. 14 and 15, the thirteen-hour long Out 1: Noli me Tangere, one of the most infamously elusive, sought-after pieces of auteurist cinema, will screen in a new digital restoration, its eight parts divided over two days with designated bathroom breaks and a potluck of culinary delights to appease and appetize those brave enough to commit to such a gargantuan viewing experience. However, the film itself, a contemporary riff on Balzac’s History of the Thirteen starring a who’s-who of nouvelle vague icons (Jean-Pierre Léaud, Juliet Berto, Michael Lonsdale, and Eric Rohmer, among others), in its radical commingling of meta-cinematic improvisation and conspiracy theory dramatics, should provide more than enough visceral pleasures to reward the undertaking.
 
JOHN CASSAVATES: ACTOR TRIBUTE AT THE NEW BEV7165 BEVERLY BLVD.
 
Nowadays John Cassavetes is most closely associated with the dozen films he made over three decades as a director, mostly independently financed works produced with a close group of friends and family. But Cassavetes also had a secondary career as an actor, which he maintained in order to fund his filmmaking and protect authorship over his work. Throughout November, the New Beverly Cinema pays tribute to Cassavetes the actor with a sixteen-film series featuring an array of beloved and less-recognized titles which speak not only to his underrated skills as a thespian, but also his collaborative acumen. Highlights include double bills of Andrew Stone’s The Night Holds Terror and Don Siegel’s Crime in the Streets (Nov. 4 and 5); Elaine May’s Mikey & Nickey and Giuliano Montaldo’s Machine Gun McCain (Nov. 11 and 12); Paul Mazursky’s Tempest and John Badham’s Whose Life Is It Anyway? (Nov. 18 and 19); Siegel’s The Killers and Robert Parrish’s Saddle the Wind (Nov. 22 and 23); and, finally, a two-night showcase of Robert Aldrich’s The Dirty Dozen (Nov. 27 and 28). 
 
LATE-‘80s AGNÈS VARDA AT THE ROYAL11523 SANTA MONICA BLVD.
 
Beginning on Nov. 13 at Laemlle's Royal Theater, digital restorations of two little-seen films by the veteran French filmmaker Agnès Varda will each receive week-long engagements. Made back-to-back in 1986 and ’87, both Jane B. par Agnès V. (never before released in the U.S.) and Kung-Fu Master star international icon Jane Birkin. Her self-reflexive role in the former finds Varda placing her muse against a number of surrealistic backdrops as they playact and deliberate on the role of the performer, while in the latter, as a kind of surrogate figure, Birkin plays a woman approaching middle-age who unexpectedly falls in love with a teenage boy. A contrasting pair in both style and subject, the films also work as companion pieces of a sort, outlining the range of Varda’s thematic interests as well as her deft touch when interweaving elements of fiction and nonfiction into narratives just exotic enough to feel strangely familiar.
 
52 YEARS AFTER JFK AT LOS ANGELES FILMFORUM | 6712 HOLLYWOOD BLVD.
 
On Nov. 22, Los Angeles Filmforum presents a tantalizing selection of vintage films which cinematically respond to the JFK assassination in a variety of personal and provocative ways. Along with pioneering vérité filmmaker Robert Drew’s Faces of November, a document of President Kennedy’s funeral as told through the faces of his friends and family, there will be two films––Report and Television Assassination––by experimental icon Bruce Conner, a rare screening of Robert Russett’s collage animation Under the Juggernaut, as well as a hybrid piece entitled The Eternal Frame, in which director T.R. Uthco and the Ant Farm collective reenact the events originally captured by the camera of Abraham Zapruder at the site of the actual assassination. The evening, hosted at Filmforum's usual home at the Egyptian Theatre, will then conclude with a reading from Don DeLillo’s Underworld and an edited presentation of the Zapruder Film itself.   
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