Actors share memorable moments

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Jeff Bridges
Bad Blake in "Crazy Heart"
"There was a wonderful scene (in the script) where Bad shows up at a rehearsal and he's drank a whole bottle and smoked a joint and he plays the first song with this really loosey-goosey, Roy Buchanan guitar solo that we had really worked on. With these low-budget movies, as you go along they start to trim things. And they cut that scene. I blow up very rarely, but I kinda blew up. I went ape-shit. I went up to each producer and gave a little monologue about how pissed I was. I was yelling to the crowd of extras. I walked out and went in my trailer and sat there for about five or 10 minutes and had a good laugh. Then I came out and apologized to everyone and said, 'Let's do our movie, man.' "

Ben Foster
Staff Sgt. Will Montgomery in "The Messenger"
"One moment that really stood out was the scene in the kitchen with Samantha (Morton). We got a few marks on the ground but we didn't rehearse it. When we started rolling, Sam and I just listened to each other and started dancing. It was just so filled with love and clumsy need and it didn't require a whole lot of acting, being with this exquisite person. Getting to dance with her in a nine-minute take ... was a highlight of my life."

 
Joseph Gordon-Levitt
Tom Hansen in "(500) Days of Summer"
"The dance scene was one of the most remarkable days of my entire life. It's written in the script really quite like that. (Director) Marc (Webb) is extremely experienced at making a good song come to cinematic life. He hired choreographer Michael Rooney, who's a really talented guy. They taught me the steps during a couple hours they were shooting with Zooey (Deschanel) and then I went home at night and practiced it. Yeah, that was me in my living room, moving the coffee table out of the way and dancing to Hall and Oates. It turned out to be so much fun." Full Q&A: Joseph Gordon-Levitt

Christian McKay
Orson Welles in "Me and Orson Welles"
"I came to Hollywood for the first time a couple of months ago and a director friend of mine said, 'Where do you want to go, Christian?' And the only Hollywood I knew is from what I've read of Orson's Hollywood, the Brown Derby and places like that. They'd all gone! I said, 'Well, I remember reading about the oldest one, where the cowboys used to put their horses outside on Hollywood Boulevard.' He said, 'Oh yes, that's Musso & Frank. Let's go there.' We walked in and the maitre d' came up to me and said, 'We have your table, Mr. Welles.' I looked at my friend and said, 'How much have you paid for this?' And his face had gone white and he said, 'No, Christian. We didn't even know we were coming here. I've not arranged this.' He took us to the table and of course I recognized it and said, "Isn't this where 'Ed Wood' was filmed?' And the maitre d' said, 'Well, yes. But this has always been your table, Mr. Welles.' And then he insisted on calling me Mr. Welles for the rest of the evening."

 
Paul Schneider
Charles Armitage Brown in "Bright Star"
"(Director Jane Campion's) 'The Piano' is the movie that sent me to film school when I was 18. I hadn't thought about going to film school before it. All these years later I get a phone call from Jane. The whole thing was pretty surreal. We talked on the phone and I was actually staring at this poster of 'The Piano' that's framed in my kitchen. Do you expect that (Led Zeppelin drummer) John Bonham is gonna call you up the day when you buy your first pair of drumsticks? You like what you like. You don't expect what you like to come to like you back. The whole experience is sort of like this huge pink elephant in the room, that I'm sure my brain will come to grips with at some point, but right now, we're just not dealing with him." Full Q&A: Paul Schneider

Michael Sheen
Brian Clough in "The Damned United"
"There was one bit of footage of Brian, on his very last day at Leeds, going out to a training session. That was something I'd watched over and over again. You see him running up some stone steps, up to the training ground. All the press are there and they're taking pictures of him and he's in his Leeds training kit and he says something to the press and then off he goes. Well, one day we were shooting a scene on the training pitch and I needed to go to the bathroom, so I ran into the stadium at Leeds and then came back out and saw a quicker way to get back to the training pitch. I ran up these steps and as I got to the top, I realized that I was in the bit of footage that I'd watched over and over again, that I was wearing exactly what he was wearing, I'd just run up the same steps and nothing had changed. And that was very weird, to suddenly be in this thing that I'd become so familiar with. Life and art suddenly blurred. It was kind of a magical moment."
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