Clooney's Fiancee Turns Down Gaza War Crimes Tribunal Role

3:51 AM PST 08/12/2014 by Alex Ritman
AP Images

Human rights lawyer Amal Alamuddin calls for an investigation but says she is too busy to serve on United Nations inquiry

George Clooney’s fiancee, the British-Lebanese human rights lawyer Amal Alamuddin, has turned down an offer from the United Nations to investigate the possibility of war crimes committed during Israel’s latest military offensive in Gaza.

On Monday, the UN’s Human Rights Council announced that Alamuddin would sit on a three-member commission looking into violations of the rules of war, including accusations that Israel did not do enough to protect civilians, who made up the large majority of the more than 1,900 deaths.

But just hours after the announcement, Clooney’s publicist Stan Rosenfield issued a statement on Alamuddin’s behalf claiming that she had turned the role down due to other commitments.

"I am horrified by the situation in the occupied Gaza Strip, particularly the civilian casualties that have been caused, and strongly believe that there should be an independent investigation and accountability for crimes that have been committed," she said in the statement.

"I was contacted by the UN about this for the first time this morning. I am honored to have received the offer, but given existing commitments – including eight ongoing cases – unfortunately could not accept this role. I wish my colleagues who will serve on the commission courage and strength in their endeavors."

The Gaza crisis has sparked a war of words in Hollywood. A statement signed by Javier Bardem and Penelope Cruz accusing Israel of "genocide" saw figures such as Jon Voight and Relativity Media CEO Ryan Kavanaugh voice their anger at such claims, with Kavanaugh telling THR that the letter made his "blood boil."

Clooney and Alamuddin announced their engagement in April and reportedly obtained a marriage license in London in June. They are expected to tie the knot in Italy next month.

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