'Amazing Grace' to Close on Broadway, Announces National Tour

The faith-based musical, which recounts the true story of the penitent slave trader who penned the world's most beloved hymn, will play its final performance in October.

Amazing Grace is no longer praying to save its Broadway run.

Producers announced on Wednesday that the new musical — which recounts the true story of the penitent slave trader who penned the world's most beloved hymn — will close in October. However, the faith-based production will live on as a national tour.

Becoming the first closure of the 2015-16 Broadway season, the show will play its final performance at the Nederlander Theatre on Sunday, Oct. 25, upon having played 24 preview performances and 114 regular performances. Additional details on the tour from Troika Entertainment will be announced at a later date.

Directed by Gabriel Barre, the show features music and lyrics by Christopher Smith, who co-wrote the book with Arthur Giron. Josh Young, a Tony nominee for the 2012 revival of Jesus Christ Superstar, heads the cast as John Newton, the son of a British slave trader torn between loyalty to his father and the more humanistic views of his childhood sweetheart.

The production jumped to Broadway after its commercially successful tryout run in Chicago last fall, officially opening in July and kicking off the season. Though the show never found its stride at the box office — averaging $300,000 per week and filling just over half the theater's capacity — producers' attempts to tap into the faith-based market may gain more traction on the road.

"We are incredibly disappointed in the show's performance at the box office on Broadway," said producer Carolyn Rossi Copeland in a statement. "The audiences who do come leave the theater uplifted, and we are honored to have introduced the important story of John Newton to the Broadway community. … I look forward to bringing this story of hope and redemption to audiences around the country with our upcoming national tour."

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