Amber Tamblyn Recalls Harassment on Set, Blasts James Woods

David Livingston/Getty Images
Amber Tamblyn

"Mr. Woods’s accusation that I was lying sent me back to that day in that producer’s office, and back to all the days I’ve spent in the offices of men; of feeling unsure, uneasy, questioned and disbelieved, no matter the conversation."

Amber Tamblyn has spoken out about her history dealing with harassment in Hollywood in a recent essay written for The New York Times.

In her own words, the actress recalls an experience when she was 21 on the set of, presumably, Joan of Arcadia, of which she was a star at the time. Tamblyn recalls entering the office of the show's producers to discuss a crew member who "kept showing up to my apartment after work unannounced, going into my trailer while I wasn’t in it, and staring daggers at me from across the set."

The show's producers, as Tamblyn writes, responded by saying, "There are two sides to each story."

The actress then went on to write about the struggles she feels women in America face when voicing their concerns over harassment. "For women in America who come forward with stories of harassment, abuse and sexual assault, there are not two sides to every story, however noble that principle might seem," Tamblyn writes. "Women do not get to have a side. They get to have an interrogation."

Tamblyn's story comes on the heels of a Twitter skirmish with actor James Woods earlier this week — sparked by Woods' criticism of Armie Hammer's character (24 years old in the film) in the film Call Me by Your Name having a homosexual relationship with a minor (a 17-year-old) — in which she accused the now-70-year-old Woods of trying to pick her and a friend up at a bar in Las Vegas when she was 16. When she told Woods of her age, Tamblyn claims the actor responded, "Even better." Woods later responded that Tamblyn's allegations were untrue. Tamblyn expanded upon her experience with Woods in an open letter to the actor in Teen Vogue two days later. 

In the Times essay, Tamblyn once again called Woods out by name, calling him a "hypocrite." 

"Mr. Woods’s accusation that I was lying sent me back to that day in that producer’s office, and back to all the days I’ve spent in the offices of men; of feeling unsure, uneasy, questioned and disbelieved, no matter the conversation," she wrote. 

Tamblyn ended her piece with a rallying cry to fellow women, writing, "We are learning that the more we open our mouths, the more we become a choir. And the more we are a choir, the more the tune is forced to change."

comments powered by Disqus