Pret-a-Reporter

Amy Astley Leaves Teen Vogue After 13 Years as Editor-in-Chief

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Amy Astley

The EIC is heading to Architectural Digest next.

It's the end of an era: Amy Astley is exiting Teen Vogue after serving as the teen fashion glossy's editor-in-chief since January 2003 when it launched. Her next move? Taking the helm at Architectural Digest, where she'll succeed Margaret Russell as the magazine's new EIC.

"Amy’s leadership and creativity can be seen in the success of Teen Vogue, which she has built into the influential source of emerging fashion, beauty and culture for young women everywhere," said Anna Wintour, Condé Nast artistic director and Vogue editor-in-chief, who also noted that Astley's five-year stint at House & Garden as the de facto personal interior stylist for Alexander Liberman "has given her a deep knowledge and lifelong passion for design that will lift Architectural Digest to new heights."

Astley will be tasked with overseeing all editorial content as well as "reimagining and significantly expanding the brand's digital presence across all platforms and formats, and furthering the reach of Architectural Digest's design authority," according to Conde Nast in a release.

Russell, who served as AD's EIC for five and a half years, will remain at the magazine through Astley's transition before she starts consulting on arts and cultural special projects for Conde Nast.

Meanwhile, Teen Vogue will be led by Elaine Welteroth, who previously served as the glossy's beauty and health director, as well as digital editorial director Phillip Picardi and creative director Marie Sutter. Susan Plagemann will continue to serve as chief revenue officer and publisher of The Vogue Group, which includes Vogue and Teen Vogue.

"This team has thoroughly embraced the endless potential of social media and new platforms, and their understanding of the most effective way to use them to connect with audiences, embodies what it means to be an editor today," said Wintour.

Astley's departures comes six months after Conde Nast went through several rounds of layoffs. Former Teen Vogue publisher Jason Wagenheim who was among the employees let go.

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