Apple Co-Founder Steve Wozniak Disputes Ashton Kutcher's 'jOBS' Clip

Jobs and Woz back in the day.
Jobs and Woz back in the day.
 

Apple co-founder Steve Wozniak is disputing a scene shown in a new clip from the upcoming Steve Jobs biopic that stars Ashton Kutcher.

The excerpt from jOBS, slated for release in April, shows Kutcher and 1600 Penn actor Josh Gad (as Wozniak) having an argument in a parking garage over whether anyone would actually want to buy a computer. (Woz says no, while Jobs insists, "How does somebody know what they want if they've never even seen it?")

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In an email to Gawker Media's geek site Gizmodo, Wozniak wrote (whilst dropping insider-y Silicon Valley pioneer lingo in the process):

Totally wrong. Personalities and where the ideas of computers affecting society did not come from Jobs. They inspired me and were widely spoken at the Homebrew Computer Club. Steve came back from Oregon and came to a club meeting and didn't start talking about this great social impact. His idea was to make a $20 PC board and sell it for $40 to help people at the club build the computer I'd given away. Steve came from selling surplus parts at HalTed he always saw a way to make a quick buck off my designs (this was the 5th time). The lofty talk came much further down the line.

Wozniak added: "I never looked like a professional. We were both kids. Our relationship was so different than what was portrayed. I'm embarrassed, but if the movie is fun and entertaining, all the better. Anyone who reads my book iWoz can get a clearer picture."

From Open Road Films and Mark Hulme's Five Star Feature Films, jOBS debuts Friday at the Sundance Film Festival. The movie, directed by Joshua Michael Stern and penned by Matthew Whiteley, also stars Dermot Mulroney, Lukas Haas, J.K Simmons and Matthew Modine.
 
An official biopic on the Apple legend is also being worked on by Aaron Sorkin, who's met with various Jobs intimates including Wozniak.

"I've been able to talk to these people who revere him in spite of the fact that he made all of them cry at one point or another," Sorkin said in the fall. "But he made all of them better at what they were doing."

Twitter: @ErinLCarlson

Email: erin.carlson@thr.com

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