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Barry Levinson and Sheryl Crow's 'Diner' Musical Sets Out-of-Town Tryout and Broadway Dates

Sheryl Crow
Jason Merritt/Getty Images
Sheryl Crow

The stage adaptation of the 1982 MGM film will premiere in San Francisco in the fall before bowing in New York in spring 2013 in a production directed and choreographed by Tony winner Kathleen Marshall.

NEW YORK -- The new musical Diner, written by Barry Levinson with music and lyrics by Sheryl Crow, will debut with a four week tryout at San Francisco's Curran Theatre Oct. 23-Nov. 18 prior to opening on Broadway the following spring, a few months later than previously announced.

The show is based on writer-director Levinson's 1982 debut feature about six high school buddies who reunite in their twenties at their favorite diner in 1959 Baltimore, as they grapple with the transition into adulthood. 

The bittersweet comedy helped propel the careers of its young ensemble cast, led by Kevin Bacon, Ellen Barkin, Tim Daly, Steve Guttenberg, Paul Reiser, Mickey Rourke and Daniel Stern. Levinson received an Oscar nomination for his original screenplay.

Casting has yet to be announced on the musical, which will be directed and choreographed by Kathleen Marshall, a three-time Tony Award winner for her choreography on Wonderful Town, The Pajama Game and Anything Goes, which is still running on Broadway. Marshall also is currently represented by Nice Work If You Can Get It, a new musical built around songs by George and Ira Gershwin, starring Matthew Broderick and Kelli O'Hara, which opens April 24 at the Imperial Theatre.

“This is a fabulous collaboration, working with Sheryl and Kathleen," said Levinson.  “It's time to enter the next stage of the Diner journey, 30 years later."

"Our team is now ready to meet our next collaborator,” added Crow. "The theatergoers at the Curran Theatre."

BASE Entertainment is producing the musical with permission of Warner Bros. Theatre Ventures. Warner controls DVD rights to the movie. The project marks the first Broadway experience for both Crow and Levinson.