Berlin: Download THR's Day 5 Daily

A rundown of the Berlin titles already getting Oscar buzz, a look at the aging stars driving EFM's hot projects and a chat with Thomas Vinterberg about his new and personal film 'The Commune.'

The Hollywood Reporter released its fifth Berlin Film Festival daily issue, featuring a rundown of the Berlin titles already getting Oscar buzz, a look at the aging stars driving EFM's hot projects and a chat with Thomas Vinterberg about his new and personal film The Commune.

Berlin Debuts Getting Oscar Buzz
While genre films aren’t often a part of the Oscar discussion, Michael Shannon’s performance as a father protecting his superpowered young son and Kirsten Dunst’s weighty role as the mother in Jeff Nichols’ sci-fi chase drama Midnight Special could earn recognition further down the line. Other buzzy packages: Emma Thompson and Brendan Gleeson for playing a couple who resist the Nazis in Vincent Perez’s Alone in Berlin; Colin Firth and Jude Law for Michael Grandage’s literary biopic Genius; and French icon Isabelle Huppert, who dazzled in the competition entry Things to Come and is being tipped as a favorite for the Berlinale’s best actress prize. Cynthia Nixon also is getting strong reviews for her portrayal of Emily Dickinson in Terence Davies’ A Quiet Passion.

The Rise of the "Gray Dollar"
Projects starring Harrison Ford, Richard Gere, Isabelle Huppert, Willem Dafoe, Nathan Lane and J.K. Simmons are just some of the big-name EFM projects that feature the industry’s "older" talents. Buyers also are after projects that appeal to more senior moviegoers, a burgeoning demographic. Said one exec: "Older people are the fastest-growing age group in the West, and they love to go to the cinema — but for intelligent, character-driven stories, not just for visual effects and things blowing up."

"It Wasn't Like Free Sex and Drugs Everywhere"
The Commune director Thomas Vinterberg drew on his childhood as source material for the story — written with The Hunt co-writer Thomas Lindholm — of a group of idealistic young families in 1970s Copenhagen that decide to live together. He spoke with THR about nostalgia, the difference between a commune and a cult and why his next Danish movie will be "a love letter to alcohol."

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