Grammys 2015: Beyonce Reveals Personal Backstory for Emotional Performance

The singer explained the personal meaning behind her 'Selma' tribute.

"Take My Hand, Precious Lord" is not just any song to Beyonce. While the world continues to buzz about the star's Grammy performance, the artist dropped a YouTube video revealing her personal ties to the track her mom would sing to her as a little girl.

The recent Grammy winner shared with fans that she handpicked the all male choir comprised of 12 African-American men who backed her up onstage. With Beyonce and her singers dressed in all-white for the gospel hymn, their angelic performance referenced the recent racial issues, including the Ferguson debate, as the men held up the "Hands-up-don't-shoot" gesture onstage. 

“I wanted to find real men that have lived that have struggled, cried and have a light and a spirit about them," said Beyonce. "I felt like this is an opportunity to show the strength and vulnerability in black men.”

The black-and-white footage featured the men telling stories of being racially profiled and wrongfully arrested due to their skin color. One of the choir members felt that the performance was perfect timing in light of the recent events concerning diversity that occurred within the past year. 

“It’s a great message to send out to the world because of all of the turmoil going around with Ferguson and Mike Brown and things in New York that have been happening," expressed one of the choir members. "I feel like being a part of this is showing Black men in a positive light."

 

While footage from rehearsals rolled, Beyonce shared her family's connection with the civil rights movement. Her grandparents once marched with Dr. Martin Luther King, and her father was a part of the first generation of black men that attended an all-white school. 

"I feel like now I can sing for his pain, I can sing for my grandparents pain," said Beyonce. "I can sing for some of the families that have lost their sons."

Watch the behind the scenes footage below. 

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