British Film Commission Picks New U.S. Production Executive


 

LONDON -- The British Film Commission (BFC) has hired Kattie Kotok as the government-backed agency’s executive vice president of U.S. Production.

Kotok will be based in LA and joins the BFC July 23 from National Geographic Films (NGF).

There she was vice president of acquisitions and production with her resume at NGF boasting Oscar-winner March of the Penguins.

Prior to National Geographic, Kotok worked in film development at Fox Searchlight Pictures and in marketing at Paramount Pictures working on titles including One Hour Photo and A Simple Plan.

British Film Commission and Film London chief executive Adrian Wootton said: "She (Kotok) has a wealth of experience and an excellent network of relationships with the international industry which will make her an extremely valuable asset to our inward investment strategy with the U.S. and to our existing team." Heading up the BFC’s operations in LA, Kotok is charged with helping corral international productions to the U.K.

Iain Smith, chair of the British Film Commission said Kotok's appointment comes at a “very important time for the Agency, as a period of potential growth."

Said Smith: "The incoming tax credit for high end TV and animation will ensure the U.K. becomes a popular destination for international TV production which is something we absolutely have to exploit. In addition the BFC is central to delivering the U.K.’s broader international strategy with the BFI and our film agency partners, plus we are also looking to extend our remit to take advantage of the potential in the emerging markets."

Kotok noted: "In a media landscape that continues to look to and grow in the international scene, this role feels very timely and essential. I look forward to building and expanding relationships across all levels and disciplines of the entertainment business, particularly as the BFC aims to forge new paths in television and animation."

The BFC is the national body in charge of encouraging and supporting international feature film production to the U.K.

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