Bruce Springsteen Cancels North Carolina Concert Over Anti-Gay Bill

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Bruce Springsteen

"Some things are more important than a rock show, and this fight against prejudice and bigotry — which is happening as I write — is one of them," says The Boss.

Bruce Springsteen announced Friday that he has canceled an upcoming weekend show in North Carolina in protest of the state's recently passed anti-gay legislation.

Springsteen was scheduled to play Greensboro on Sunday, but said he finds the passing of House Bill 2 unacceptable, and he is doing his part to push back.

"To my mind, it’s an attempt by people who cannot stand the progress our country has made in recognizing the human rights of all of our citizens to overturn that progress," Springsteen said in a statement.

In March, Republican Gov. Pat McCrory signed the bill, which prevents in-state municipalities from passing their own anti-discrimination regulations. And what's more, it prevents transgender individuals from using the bathroom for the sex with which they identify.

Several companies and Hollywood personalities also have announced that they plan to sever ties with the state over the law.

Springsteen acknowledged that there are other businesses and groups within the state pushing back on the legislation.

"Taking all of this into account, I feel that this is a time for me and the band to show solidarity for those freedom fighters," said Springsteen. "As a result, and with deepest apologies to our dedicated fans in Greensboro, we have canceled our show scheduled for Sunday."

He continued: "Some things are more important than a rock show, and this fight against prejudice and bigotry — which is happening as I write — is one of them. It is the strongest means I have for raising my voice in opposition to those who continue to push us backwards instead of forwards."

Not long after the announcement from Springsteen, the Human Rights Campaign released a statement praising the musician.

“Bruce Springsteen is a hero and an icon because he gives voice, both through his music and his advocacy, to those who struggle against injustice and equality,” HRC President Chad Griffin said in the statement. “It means so much that he has spoken out against this hateful bill on behalf of thousands of citizens whose rights and fundamental dignity are being trampled by the leadership of North Carolina.”

April 8, 1:40 p.m. Updated with a statement from the Human Rights Campaign.

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