Cannes: Christoph Waltz to Star, Direct True-Crime Drama 'Worst Marriage in Georgetown'

Based on a New York Times Magazine article written by Franklin Foer, the project tells the true story of Albrect Muth (Waltz), an eccentric social climber who seduced and married a wealthy older widow, Viola Drath.

Christoph Waltz will star in and direct The Worst Marriage in Georgetown, a crime drama that Voltage has just come aboard to finance in full and produce.

Based on a New York Times Magazine article written by Franklin Foer, the project tells the true story of Albrect Muth (Waltz), an eccentric social climber who seduced and married a wealthy older widow, Viola Drath.

The article describes how the pair threw lavish events in their home, which were attended by the most influential politicians from around the globe, as Muth falsified his background and became a Washington, D.C. luminary. However, according to the article, Muth's house of cards came crashing down when Drath was found murdered. Muth’s integrity, ethics and public persona were put on trial in this fascinating insight into Washington, D.C.’s most elite circles of power.

David Auburn wrote the script.

An October 12, 2015 start date has been set.

Waltz, making his feature directorial debut with the project, will produce the drama along with Erica Steinberg (Inglorious Basterds) and Voltage’s Nicolas Chartier.

Zev Foreman and Jonathan Deckter will exec produce for Voltage, alongside M. Janet Hill, who originally optioned the material.

Voltage, which recently added Deckter as president and John Fremes as president of international sales, will be selling international rights in Cannes. ICM Partners will handle U.S. rights with Voltage.

Waltz is the Austrian actor who scored international acclaim and Oscar wins for his work in Quentin Tarantino’s Inglorious Basterds and Django Unchained. He last starred in Tim Burton’s Big Eyes and will be seen in the latest Bond movie, Spectre, which opens November 6.

Waltz is repped by ICM Partners and Sloane Offer.

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