Pret-a-Reporter

Designers Dish: Roger Vivier's Bruno Frisoni

The red-carpet footwear designer unveiled some more masculine styles during his Paris Fashion Week presentation.

It was a belle jour when Roger Vivier presented the new Belle du Jour-inspired collection amongst the grand rooms and garden of the Maison de l’Amerique Latine on the chic Boulevard Saint-Germain.

With a television installation giving way to grand displays of fashion footwear, designer Bruno Frisoni was recalling Catherine Deneuve’s good-girl-gone-bad, debuting an updated trumpet heel on the Belle Vivier buckle pump during Paris Fashion Week.

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Frisoni has been creative director of Vivier for a decade as it’s risen to become a red-carpet staple, festooning the feet of Jessica Chastain, Alison Williams, and Elizabeth Banks, and with clutches carried by Kerry Washington, Keira Knightley and Jennifer Lawrence — and that's just in the last few weeks.

We caught up with Frisoni as he walked us through his pop-art “T-shirt collection” with black and white graphic stars and colorful paint splatters on traditional buckle flats and bags, as well as the pumps covered with minute gold studs Frisoni likened to champagne bubbles, and his highly coveted red-carpet collection.

He also added a few menswear style with derby shoes and thigh-high stretch boots to the traditional talons made famous by the house.

Pret-a-Reporter: You've added several different styles in additional to the red-carpet ready shoes.

Bruno Frisoni: I think it’s an adjustment for Roger Vivier. If you look at the past there have always been masculine styles, but for me it was about time to come forward with something very clear and very well studied. It’s really part of the collection we need today. A woman today likes to wear very feminine stuff with masculine accessories, including shoes, so we created these masculine styles that are very recognizable but also very light in a way.

Do you think women are dressing more casually these days, as opposed to very high platform heels of a few years ago?

Women still want feminine high heels of course; one is not excluding the other. It’s just a matter of time of day or the situation – running to school or work and not thinking about being very dressed up, but she still has on the right coat or pants. It can be a very feminine shoe with a masculine outfit, or even a feminine outfit with a masculine shoe. It’s not "transgender," but it’s the woman borrowing the man’s jacket one night and then not giving it back. It’s easy in the way Americans would say – not relaxed but something you can wear without thinking too much. I wanted Rogver Vivier to grow in that way, and to have the pieces still be recognizable.

You are very present on the red carpet, do you design with Hollywood in mind?

We are very present with bags and shoes, but you know most of it I know I am thinking of a woman’s needs. If stars join us it’s fine! Women want to be looking younger and be themselves and have fun and not be too serious. It’s also a cool attitude and a mix of things. You can’t live on red carpet alone. I love all of my friends wearing all of my things, and there’s a lot for the red carpet for sure. I have to say no, I don’t design with that in mind. I know some of the pieces would be desired by Cate Blanchett or Tilda Swinton or Isabelle Huppert, but I don’t do anything specifically with anyone in mind — unless she asks me of course.

 

What is your favorite way to relax when designing a collection?

I go skiing, for example last weekend, and the weekend before, and the weekend before that. When I know the snow is there I go as much as I can. In the summer I go to Morocco where my house is and spend time cuddling the cat or cuddling myself reading books.

Then when can we expect some Roger Vivier ski boots?

We actually have some biker boots that will keep you warm and are perfect for going out in St. Moritz or Aspen. But ski boots? The big chunky ones? Ha.

Next season?

Not next season, it will be summer, but maybe next year!

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