'Die Hard' Fan Who Took out Full-Page THR Ad for New Movie Pitch: "My Chances Are Slim to None"

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Die Hard

"Would I love the opportunity to get in a room with those guys and really talk in detail about my idea? Absolutely."

He is just a passionate Die Hard fan who wants to see one more good installment made of the popular action franchise. 

In the Nov. 20 issue of The Hollywood Reporter, one Eric D. Wilkinson, a producer and writer of independent movies, took out a full-page ad to pitch his idea for a new film in the Die Hard series. The ad is addressed to Bruce Willis and "the makers of Die Hard," among others.

In short, Wilkinson's pitch is about a present day 60-year-old John McClane who finds himself in prison after being wrongfully convicted of murder in the death of a sex trafficker. While behind bars, McClane gets caught up in a prison riot masterminded by an unrelated terrorist organization, and somehow, McClane saves the day.

Wilkinson spoke to Gawker about his decision to take out the ad, and said the odds of Hollywood calling about his pitch are practically non existent. "Oh, I’m not going to hear from them," he told the website. "My chances are slim to none."

"Would I love the opportunity to get in a room with those guys and really talk in detail about my idea? Absolutely. But realistically, this is going to trend for a couple days, and then I’m going to back to doing what it is that I do," Wilkinson told Gawker. "I have material, but bear in mind that it’s only been two or three weeks ago that Len Wiseman and Lorenzo di Boneventura [sic] announced that they were making Die Hard: Year One. I have a treatment."

Wilkinson said the long shot was worth the money.

"I’m a Die Hard fan, and I said, ‘You know what, I just want them to make a good Die Hard movie. Here’s my idea, what do you think?” he told Gawker.

"People should know this isn’t some wacky get-rich scheme," said Wilkinson. "I’m a fan, man. I’m a die-hard Die Hard fan."

See the full ad below:

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