Drake Tops Justin Bieber as Most-Streamed Artist on Spotify

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Drake

The milestone is especially impressive given the limited time that the whole of Drake's new record 'Views' has been available on the platform — less than a week.

Headlines over the last day have pointed to Drake overtaking Justin Bieber as the most-streamed artist on Spotify, citing numbers on analytics aggregator Kworb. The feat is accurate, Spotify confirmed to Billboard this morning.

The milestone is especially impressive given the limited time that the whole of Drake's new record Views has been available on the platform — less than a week. Its first two weeks were spent as an Apple Music exclusive, yielding a streaming record of 245.1 million listens in the U.S. during the record's first tracking week. (That sum includes plays of the album’s songs on Apple Music, as well as the handful of songs from the set that were available at other streaming services like Spotify.)

Views quickly sold more than a million copies (1.03 million) in two weeks' time, and it is the first album released in 2016 to surpass 1 million copies sold. Only two albums have sold more than a million this year: Views and Adele’s 25, which was released in 2015.

In other Spotify milemarkers, the company has announced that its in-house playlists are generating over 1 billion streams a week. The curated lists include Rap Caviar, Baila Reggaeton, Get Turnt, Teen Party and Exitos de Hoy, among others.

The news is a victory for hybridized human-algorithm curation, according to the company's chief strategy and content officer, Stefan Blom. He said in a statement, "We build these playlists through a combination of the best music experts around, lots of work hunting for great sounds, and a ‘feedback loop’ of real-time user data that tells us which tracks listeners are loving more, and which tracks they may be loving a little less. This lets us add tracks that are starting to explode, and switch out tracks that have been around for a while." 

 

This article originally appeared on Billboard.com.

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