Entenmann’s Forced to Apologize After Casey Anthony Not Guilty Tweet

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The baked goods company linked the verdict for Caylee’s death to “eating tasty treats.”

Baked goods company Entenmann’s was forced to apologize Tuesday after linking Casey Anthony's not guilty verdict for murdering 2-year-old daughter Caylee to eating mini donuts.

After Casey was acquitted of murder charges, #notguilty quickly became a trending topic on Twitter as those who followed the case discussed the verdict.

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To capitalize on the traffic, Entenmann’s included the trending phrase in a promotion: "Who's #notguilty about eating all the tasty treats they want?"

After outrage exploded online, the company removed the Tweet (see a screengrab here) and quickly issued an apology.

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"Sorry everyone, we weren't trying to reference the trial in our tweet! We should have checked the trending hashtag first," it posted.

Later, the social media company that Tweets on behalf of the company, Likeable, apologized in a lengthy statement.

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"The truth is, our team was leveraging the trending topics and moving so fast they neglected to see what the hashtag was related to. It was obviously insensitive, and on behalf of the entire Likeable team and our client, Entenmann's, I'm sorry. Please know that I am working on refining our process to ensure that this does not happen again," said the CEO, Dave Kerpin.

Soon after, a parody account was created, @EntenmannsPR.

"The only thing your dad will smell in the trunk of your car is our delicious donuts! #notguilty," it posted. "Safety tip kids: Never go swimming after a whole box of chocolate donuts.You'll drown in deliciousness! #notguilty" was another.

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This isn't the first time a company has come under fire for making light on Twitter.

After the Egypt uprising, designer Kenneth Cole wrote, "Millions are in uproar in #Cairo. Rumor is they heard our new spring collection is now available online at http://bit.ly/KCairo."

After being derided online, the company removed the Tweet and apologized twice.

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