'Fifty Shades of Grey' Star Left Scarred by BBC Serial Killer Role

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Jamie Dornan has admitted to carrying some of his character's anger as 'The Fall' prepares for its second season

Irish actor and Fifty Shades of Grey star Jamie Dornan has admitted to having been deeply affected by BBC drama The Fall, in which he plays a serial killer terrorizing Belfast.

The second season of the series — the broadcaster’s most popular drama on its BBC2 channel for 20 years and available on Netflix in the U.S. — is due to return to U.K. screens later in the year.

"You can’t fail to be left slightly scarred by inhabiting someone like that for two seasons. I do carry elements of him with me in a worrying way. I find him relatable … I have a deep understanding of him," Dornan said at a special screening on Tuesday in quotes published by U.K. newspaper The Guardian.

"He had such a distaste for everything. You do carry some of that anger and that hatred in you a little bit, especially toward the end of a few months playing him."

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Dornan’s co-star Gillian Anderson, who plays a detective looking into the investigation, added that she found her character enthralling.

"Who she is and everything she stands for and how she operates — I find that very compelling and I don’t feel like I have really seen that before," she said.

"She makes it very clear how she feels about violence against women, how these women are represented and how they are perceived. She is a supporter of women and women being treated respectfully and she doesn’t mince words. It’s in her bones. I like that about her."

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Meanwhile, The Fall’s writer Allan Cubitt defended its graphic violence, which had been enough for U.K. tabloid The Daily Mail to describe it as "the most repulsive drama ever broadcast on British TV."

"There were plenty of people of people who understood what I was trying to achieve. In a sense it’s a dissection of a certain kind of male view, an exploration of misogyny," he said.

"Anything that sets out to explore a complex and difficult subject like that always runs the risk of being held up as being an example of it, rather than a critique of it. Obviously if you think The Fall is misogynistic then I would have failed completely, abjectly."

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