Fox Sports' Joe Buck Reveals Hair Plug Addiction

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Joe Buck

"Broadcasting is a brutal, often unfair business, where looks are valued more than skill," the sports announcer discloses in an upcoming memoir. "I was worried that if I lost my hair, I would lose my job."

Fox Sports’ Joe Buck told viewers in 2011 that a virus in his vocal cord caused problems with his voice, but he now reveals that it was really due to a hair plug addiction.

He tells the full story in his upcoming memoir, Lucky Bastard: My Life, My Dad, and The Things I’m Not Allowed to Say on TV, to be released Nov. 15. A preview of the book was published Thursday on Sports Illustrated.

Buck reveals in the book that one of his biggest fears growing up was losing his hair. He got his first hair replacement treatment at the age of 24 in 1993, writing that that is when "I, Joseph Francis Buck, became a hair-plug addict."

He writes that he would fly back to New York for more hair plug procedures whenever he had a break in his Fox Sports schedule. "Broadcasting is a brutal, often unfair business, where looks are valued more than skill," Buck writes. "I was worried that if I lost my hair, I would lose my job. O.K., that’s bull—. It was vanity. Pure vanity. I just told myself I was doing it for TV."

In 2011, Buck had just undergone his eighth hair replacement procedure, but when he woke up, he found he had lost his voice. He thought that because of recent stress in his life at the time and something used in the procedure paralyzed his vocal cord. Buck writes that he was “too scared and embarrassed” to tell anyone what had happened, so he lied.

"I said it was a virus. I didn’t say it was an elective procedure to add hair to the front of my head. It was embarrassing," he says in the book. "Any surgery done to improve one’s looks is not really something someone wants to talk about. So it’s very cathartic to get this out."

Buck adds that he underwent numerous procedures in hopes of looking younger, with fuller, thicker hair. He now reflects on his addiction to hair plugs as an "ego thing, whether I was on TV or not."

The memoir reveals that though he would consider getting another treatment done, Buck has not had hair replacement surgery since 2011.

"I’m a flawed, hard-working, hard-trying person. I didn’t write this book to change anyone else’s life," he notes. "I wrote this book to be as open and as honest as I can be."

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