Globe nominees speak out

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Complete coverage:
'Atonement' out front
Strike curbs enthusiasm
Nominees react
'Massive sweep' for Focus
'Damages' leads TV pack

In a year of topical, often violent films, a period love story like "Atonement" stands out. But the forces behind the most nominated film of the Golden Globes aren't sure it is all that different from other current fare. Director Joe Wright said that while he saw the movie as a "classic love story, it's also about young men at war, and what can be more relevant than that?" Star James McAvoy said the film's universality makes it appealing even in this age of the blockbuster. " 'Atonement' is about basic human issues like redemption and forgiveness," he said. "Its success doesn't depend on timing or on fashion or on fad. It doesn't depend on hitting its target market. I've talked to interviewers who are 'Transformers' kind of people, and having seen the movie they end up coming out moved by it."

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John Travolta is not immune to the excitement surrounding nominations and awards: Until he received the phone call with news of his "Hairspray" nom, the actor was up all night staring at the clock in his New York apartment. "You try not to anticipate it happening, but you can't help it," he said. "I had to prove to myself that I could go the distance with this part." Travolta said he wouldn't rule out showcasing his musical talents again. "I'd love to do another musical in the near future," he said, "but it's a special art form -- one that needs to be honored and really cared for."

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"I'm in the old section of Paris drinking Edith Piaf's favorite champagne, Bollinger, which has become mine," said exuberant "La Vie en Rose" star Marion Cotillard of her best musical actress nomination. "The first big reaction was when it did well in France, and then the film got recognition all around the world. It's just been a series of surprises, and I hope it never ends." Picturehouse president Bob Berney wasn't surprised by Cotillard's success. "For me, it was expected. I think when people in Los Angeles met her in person, it was shocking to them how different she was from the character."

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Sitting in her London home and nine months pregnant, Helena Bonham Carter was more concerned Thursday with begetting a child than a Golden Globe statue. "Right now, I'm trying to have a baby," she said. "When I'm done with the labor and contractions, I can think about award shows -- which I suppose can take longer than the labor and contractions." Bonham Carter also is surprised that she could pull off songs and lyrics. "Pretty much from the womb I wanted to be in a musical, but I never thought I could sing beyond the bathroom," she said.

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The morning of the Golden Globe nominations was different for "Grey's Anatomy" creator Shonda Rhimes this year. "I slept through (the announcement)," she said. "Grey's," which won the best drama series Globe last time around, landed two noms: best drama and best supporting actress for Emmy winner Katherine Heigl. Rhimes' other series, the "Grey's" spinoff "Private Practice," didn't get a nom, but she is OK with that. "It's fine," she said. "We enjoy the work on the show, and hopefully will have the chance of doing more of it on both 'Practice' and 'Grey's.' " Production on both shows has been suspended because of the writers strike. The work stoppage also has modified the way Rhimes celebrates her show's nominations. "Today I'll take my daughter to school, will walk the picket line and will keep reorganizing my closet," she said.

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Despite the sometimes nasty nature of her character on FX's "Damages," Glenn Close insisted she really is a nice person. Close learned of her nomination for best TV drama series actress from a friend in Florida while visiting her hometown of Greenwich, Conn. The multiple award-winner, who won a Globe in 2005 for "The Lion in Winter" and was nominated in 2006 for "The Shield," said her character gets noticed because it's rare for a woman her age to get such a role. "She keeps people off balance all the time, and people are intrigued by that," she said.

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"Eastern Promises" and "Atonement" producer Paul Webster was in London heading to a massage for his "dingy shoulder" when he learned of the three "Promises" and seven "Atonement" noms. "My masseuse was absolutely unimpressed, and I think she elbowed my shoulder even harder than usual," he said. Webster was especially happy about the noms for David Cronenberg's "Promises." "I think it's belated and deserved recognition for one of the world's greatest filmmakers. Long may it continue," he said. Webster called "Atonement" star Keira Knightley, who was "her usual modest self" and asked whether his wife was coming. "She wants to talk with her about what to wear," he said.

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"Woo-hoo!" shouted "The Simpsons Movie" director David Silverman when he learned of the animated feature's Globe nomination. Producer James L. Brooks' reaction was a little less Homeresque at first. "I had the feeling that any human being should have when the phone suddenly rings at 5 a.m. -- that something bad has happened," he said. "It was somebody telling me I was nominated, but by then I had already put five bullets in the wall." Jokes aside, the pair said it was a great feeling to have the movie be recognized in a world of CGI and 3-D animated tales, especially one 18 years in the making. "Anytime that wiggly drawings are acknowledged, it's a true honor," "Simpsons" creator Matt Groening said. Silverman said he'll celebrate the nomination with a haircut, a new shirt and perhaps a doughnut. But for showrunner Brooks, he'll head to the picket line with the rest of the striking writers. "Of course, there's a pall," he said. "We live by diffusing our misery with jokes. This is not a great holiday season in town, and it's painful. The amazing thing is the kind of goodwill on the line every day, and that's sustaining people."

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"Hairspray" producers Neil Meron and Craig Zadan were once a rare pair in Hollywood pushing traditional movie musicals, but Thursday saw their latest film nominated for best musical or comedy. "A few years ago, there were no musicals nominated in this category," Meron said. "Craig and I made it our mission to bring them back, first on TV ... and then in film. If it wasn't for the success of (our project) 'Chicago,' there probably wouldn't be a 'Dreamgirls' or 'Sweeney Todd.' What a change." Their track record helped persuade John Travolta to don a dress. "We felt a great burden of responsibility when we talked to John about doing his first musical in nearly 30 years," Zadan said. "We promised him we could take this all the way, so it was wonderful to see him nominated. And just a year ago, (best musical actress nominee) Nikki Blonsky was scooping ice cream."

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Tom Wilkinson said he was polishing shoes at his house in the U.K. when he got the call that he was nominated for his supporting role in "Michael Clayton." "It's a great feeling in the sense that even at my great age, I'm still doing decent work which people are interested in," he said. "And I love the Golden Globes. Have I ever won one? No, no, I don't think I have -- but it's always the best time."

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Somehow, David Duchovny's manager was able to penetrate the actor's "hotel fortress" in Vancouver to alert him of his Golden Globe nomination for best actor in a TV comedy series. "She said it was an awards-related emergency," Duchovny said. The "Californication" star had been up all night shooting scenes for the new "X-Files" movie. He made sure to turn off all his devices and hang a "do not disturb" sign but nevertheless was thrilled to hear the news. "Awards are nice in the moment, but (a nomination) is wonderful because it brings attention to the show," he said. The multiple-award winner -- he won a best actor Globe in 1997 for TV's "The X-Files" -- planned to celebrate by going back to sleep, dreaming he was never awakened and waking up to live it all over again.

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"I'm so excited! It's mother and daughter getting nominated," Nikki Blonsky quipped about her "Hairspray" nom for best performance by an actress in a motion picture, comedy or musical, and that of her co-star John Travolta in the supporting actor category. Blonsky, who heard the news in Toronto, said the moment her name was uttered was as shocking and exciting as the moment she found out she got the part. "It was a huge shock to me, a huge and utter shock. I was crying, jumping and throwing things," she said.

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Producer Kathleen Kennedy woke up to see her flight from New York to Los Angeles canceled because of a snowstorm, but at least two of her films were nominated: "The Diving Bell and the Butterfly" and "Persepolis." And they're in an unlikely category for the oft-nominated Hollywood vet: best foreign-language film. "This is exactly what the Academy Awards should be about: promoting films that don't have the resources of some with an $80 million-$100 million marketing budget," she said. "The only frustration is 'Diving Bell' not being qualified for the foreign-language Oscar, which is and will continue to be confusing to people. But the writing and directing nominations are a big help."

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Of all the people who were surprised by the best picture drama nomination for the Russian mobster movie "Eastern Promises," perhaps the most surprised was the man who made it. Director David Cronenberg, who had never been nominated for a Golden Globe, had been girding for one major nomination; he never saw the other one coming. "I'd have been surprised if Viggo wasn't nominated, but I really didn't expect the movie to be nominated," he said.

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Julie Taymor sat in bed in New York and watched the nominations live. "It's wonderful to be a dark horse because it means people are voting with their heart," the ecstatic "Across the Universe" director said of her film's inclusion in the best musical lineup. Her hope now is that more people will see the film. "It's about tremendous joy and inspiration, and that's what I want to hear -- that people were moved and transformed by the work."

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Golden Globe nominations are no stranger to "Charlie Wilson's War" screenwriter Aaron Sorkin, who received noms for the politically themed films "A Few Good Men" (1992) and "The American President" (1995). " 'Charlie Wilson's War' shouldn't be confused with other political stories," Sorkin said. "It's not what you're going to read on the front page yesterday. It's an outrageous true story that very few people have heard." Sorkin learned of his third nom at 5:30 a.m., when he was awakened by a phone call from his publicist. He said he was disappointed that the film's director, Mike Nichols, was not nominated but thrilled that star Tom Hanks is in the race for best actor in a comedy. The writers strike didn't put a damper on the nomination, either. "I want the strike to be over like everybody else," he said. "It's just a nice thing; a really nice day." Sorkin's celebrating will include picking up his daughter from school. "I'm sure there will be Gummi Bears."

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Producer Walter Parkes was dozing in a cab from the airport into New York when he noticed several missed voicemail and e-mail messages on his BlackBerry. He realized why he was receiving calls but didn't expect the news to be so good: two nominations for "The Kite Runner" and four for "Sweeney Todd." "What Tim (Burton) did with 'Sweeney' is beyond what we ever imagined," he said. "It's a very uncompromising movie, and there's no guarantee how the Hollywood Foreign Press would respond. And 'The Kite Runner' is equally a one-off. You never go into these things expecting (a nomination)." Although the films are different, Parkes said both were challenging to make. "Kite Runner" has much of its dialogue in Dari, while "Sweeney" is an R-rated musical. "They don't fit in an easy genre, and that's what attracted people to them," said Parkes, who is en route to the Dubai International Film Festival to screen "Kite."

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An exuberant Ernest Borgnine awoke to find himself nominated for his first Golden Globe since his win as best dramatic actor for "Marty" in 1956. "The first one since 'Marty'! Jesus Christ, it's hard to believe, I swear! My kid called me up from Hawaii and said, 'Dad! What the hell did you do?' " he said, laughing. "I got a call at 5:20 this morning and a guy said, 'You've just been nominated!' At 5:20 in the morning, you don't expect to be nominated for anything!" He is nominated for best actor in a motion picture made for television for Hallmark Channel's "A Grandpa for Christmas." "Maybe it'll open the eyes of some casting directors that 90 is not old. It's about working. That's what keeps us young, and that's not just actors. That's everyone in this world! It's not just a young man's game. Hey, as long as I can stand up and do my work, I'll be right there knocking on doors saying, 'Hey, guys! Let's go!' It keeps you going. As long as you love what you do, it's better than breaking rocks!"

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Ricky Gervais wasn't able to accept his Emmy for lead actor in a comedy series in September, and he's not taking any chances on the Golden Globes. "If Steve Carell wins, I'm going up there like he did for me, and I'm going to keep it." Gervais, who won a Globe in the same category for "The Office" in 2004, is just happy that HBO's "Extras," in its final season, has stayed hot on the heels of his other successful comedy series. But he also said it would be nice to get his Emmy back from Carell. "I don't care if he goes down for this," he said. "Actually I do, because I want 'The Office' to be syndicated. I'm all for forgiveness, I just deserve the Emmy, really. What good is it to him with my name on it?"

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Shortly after finishing up an interview with NBC's "Today" in New York, Ellen Page was told of her nomination for best actress in a comedy for "Juno." "I'm excited," she said. "Diablo Cody wrote one of the best screenplays I've ever read." The character of Juno was one the 20-year-old actress had never seen before. "She had this character ... devoid of stereotype. It was a unique, witty and absolutely genuine screenplay. I read it. I loved it. I became obsessed about playing this role," she said.

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"Juno" executive producer Nathan Kahane said he felt "lame" for waking up early to watch the nominations live on TV and "giggly" over the film's three noms. "It's the little movie that could," the Mandate Pictures president said. Kahane was, however, "deeply disappointed" that director Jason Reitman was overlooked. "For those of us around the movie, we know the contribution from him," he said. "There were a million ways to make this screenplay wrong and one way to make it right. He made choices that really made the movie sing." As for "Juno's" star Ellen Page, Kahane likened her to Meryl Streep. "I've never worked with an actor who inhabits a character we well as this girl did so naturally. 'Juno' or no 'Juno,' she was destined to become a star."

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"My sister in L.A. called me in L.A. at some ungodly hour crying and upset, in hysterics, and I thought something bad happened," said "Lars and the Real Girl" best actor nominee Ryan Gosling. "Then my mom called in hysterics, and I was finally able to work out what they were excited about. I think they see more gift bags and swag rooms in their future." It's been a year since Gosling's "Half Nelson" nomination, but "they feel, 'All right, let's do it again.' " He's more focused on the importance of this year's nom to the film. "I would be lying if I didn't say I was disappointed (writer) Nancy Oliver, (director) Craig Gillespie and other members of the cast weren't nominated, but I hope this brings an awareness of the film we can't afford," he said.

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Christina Applegate was in Laguna doing a photo shoot when she learned of her best actress nom for "Samantha Who?" -- her second Globe nomination for best actress in a television series since 1999. "I feel fantastic about it. I'm so excited," she said. "This is the first time where it happened that I couldn't sleep, and I actually got nervous and didn't know where it was going to go. It's my baby. The show has been embraced, and I'm grateful. ... It's a good day."

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When Mary-Louise Parker's publicist called to tell her about her nomination, she burned the waffles. "The kids love it when the fire alarm goes off. It's loud and exciting," she said, laughing. Parker, who received her third nomination for the role of Nancy Botwin on Showtime's "Weeds" -- she won in 2006 -- said she is surprised people still relate so well to a drug-dealing suburban mom. "I thought people might be kind of horrified by her. But whenever people identify with a character that is embroiled in something even slightly to the left, it's a good thing because it takes them out of their own personal narrative and they can empathize with somebody else."

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"Very sweet," Ted Danson said from Ojai of his 11th Golden Globe nomination, this one for FX's "Damages." "I just think everything starts with the writing, and the writing was so bright. Todd and Glenn Kessler and Daniel Zelman worked so hard on this. We'd get pages of rewrites as we were heading for the set, and it just got better and better. Glenn Close and Rose Byrne are brilliant. And the directors, too. It all starts with the writing, and someone of Glenn Close's caliber attracts talent. It was such a great character that if I hadn't been nominated, then shame on me."

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Saoirse Ronan's agent told her to "keep a lookout" for a possible best supporting actress nomination for "Atonement," but the Irish 13-year-old tried not to think about it. "It's so easy to get disappointed, but this mornin' Dad got a call, and I heard him say, 'Yes!' " Her driver on the Pennsylvania set of "The Lovely Bones" wasn't surprised. "She said, 'It's all over base camp already,' " Ronan said, laughing. "I've written stories and won a few school awards, but I've never gotten a Golden Globe for writing about my trip to the zoo."

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Casey Affleck woke to the news that he earned a supporting actor nomination for his role as Robert Ford in "The Assassination of Jesse James by the Coward Robert Ford" -- and he was going to begin his celebration with an "incredible" breakfast. "I'm really proud of the movie," he said. "This really belongs to everyone involved. ... Andrew (Dominik) wrote a character whose life was very moving, and he directed me according to his vision. His direction was always very helpful. (He) challenged me and pushed me. It has to be shared with the filmmaker."

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Rose Byrne, nominated for supporting actress for her role as Ellen Parsons on FX's "Damages," said from New York: "I'm very surprised, and I'm so proud of the show. It's surreal. We've been picked up and we start after the strike ends. I think FX will be thrilled. It's great." Resonating with audiences "is the genre of the show and how they structured the one case over one season. Also, the timeline and the writers were so clever, and I'm so proud of them."

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"I'm in L.A. getting all these phone calls from New York with people whispering because they woke me up. Like I'm going back to sleep!" said "Gone Baby Gone" supporting actress nominee Amy Ryan. "It's such a surprise, but at the same time it feels familiar because I've been dreaming about this for a long time." Director Ben Affleck made her dream a reality. "I thought, 'I'll never get this part because no one knows me.' He said, 'I don't care that no one knows you.' " She said this and her role in Sidney Lumet's "Before the Devil Knows You're Dead" were "two great gifts from two great men." So what's next? "I'm going to go to the set (of 'The Changeling'), congratulate Angelina and Clint and go to work."

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"I'm very excited. I'm in London. I literally just found out about an hour ago. My publicist rang me up and said, 'Congratulations!' and I thought it was about a job I just signed on for, and then it dawned on me," said Andy Serkis, a nominee for best supporting actor for HBO's "Longford," speaking about his role as real-life child killer Ian Brady. "It was a really sensitive issue," he said of the role. "In (the U.K.), (Ian Brady and Myra Hindley) represent the benchmark of evil. I wanted to research his relationship with Myra and the way he was brought up, how he created his own moral universe. He actually wrote a book, a treatise on evil. For myself, I had to find something more personal, like what my life is validated by, and that would be the birth of my children, the purity of that moment seeing them born. I applied that to Ian Brady where the most comparable moment was taking life."

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"It was a very civilized 8 a.m. when I got the phone call," first-time nominee Jon Hamm said. "It's a good way to wake up." Hamm, who is nominated for the lead role in AMC's "Mad Men," said he has been pleasantly surprised by the audience's reaction to the series and his "strongly American" character, Don Draper. "You make these things, and you hope people like them, so a positive response is gravy," he said. "But (a nomination) is whatever goes on top of gravy."

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Writer-director Cristian Mungiu was with his cast at the Israel premiere of his Romanian abortion drama "4 Months, 3 Weeks and 2 Days" when news of his best foreign-language film nomination arrived from his U.S. distributor, IFC Entertainment. "We hoped this might happen, and we were very happy because there were more eligible films for this award than the Oscar," he said. IFC head Jonathan Sehring isn't concerned that the abortion story line will alienate viewers or voters. "It's a thriller, and that's just the dramatic axis of the film," he said. "Both sides of the abortion argument have taken the film in, which is fascinating."

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Of the animated film nom for the Paris-set "Ratatouille," director Brad Bird said: "What's gratifying about it is that it's the international press and the movie -- admittedly we made it here -- but it is sort of an international film. We were trying to capture the rhythms of another country and make it feel true to that without being over the top." He is looking forward to seeing "so many of my heroes," including nominees Alec Baldwin and Tina Fey at the ceremony. Bird added: "Steven Spielberg gave me my first shot, so the fact that he's getting the Cecil B. DeMille Award is nice."

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It was a long birthday morning for producer Richard Zanuck, who came home from an overnight shoot of "Yes Man" with Jim Carrey on the Warner Bros. lot just in time to learn of the four Golden Globe nominations for "Sweeney Todd." "It's like having another child and suddenly it scores a touchdown," Zanuck said of the nomination. The Oscar-winning producer ("Driving Miss Daisy") was particularly proud of director Tim Burton's nom. "He brings such a unique vision that only he brings. It can't be duplicated by anyone because nobody sees right through the same prism as he does." Zanuck also reserved kudos for the film's two nominated leads, Johnny Depp and Helena Bonham Carter. "They had to work like they've never worked before."

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Diablo Cody was in her Minneapolis hotel room Thursday morning when she got a call from "Juno" director Jason Reitman telling her to turn on the television. Cody, who was on her last stop on the "Juno" press tour, couldn't find CNN on the tube, so Reitman had to relay the noms to her in real time. "I'm out of my mind!" Cody said. "I'm so stoked!" It has been a big year for Cody, who said her life has completely changed since penning "Juno." "I think 'Juno' is an idealized version of myself," she said of the lead character. "I've never been that clever. I've never been that cool." Cody said she felt it was important to bring a character into the theaters that was multidimensional, interesting and a girl. "Those qualities don't often commingle in mainstream cinema," she said. Cody found those qualities in fellow nominee Ellen Page, who Cody referred to as her mentor despite a 10-year age difference. "I'm so intimidated by Ellen. She's so talented and intelligent."

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"I was warned this was coming at 1 p.m. London time, but I took my afternoon nap anyway, woke up and found all these messages on my voicemail," said "The Diving Bell and the Butterfly" writer Ronald Harwood. "Don't you think it's cool to do that? I think it's the epitome of cool." His happiness was muted a bit when a friend e-mailed him about the possible writers guild disruption of the Golden Globes ceremony. "I've never been to the Golden Globes," Harwood said. "It's not too long from now, and if the writers don't come, I shall have to boycott it, I'm afraid."

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Popping awake at 4:30 a.m., "Hairspray" director Adam Shankman's early morning cable watching of "It Happened One Night" became his own "it happened one morning" as he heard "Hairspray's" nominations announced live purely by chance. "All of a sudden my BlackBerry started going off, and I switched the channel," said Shankman, who hopes nominees Nikki Blonsky and John Travolta will revel in this moment and not let the ongoing strike dampen any excitement. "These were extraordinary risky kinds of roles," he said. "I feel that I promised them that this would turn out a certain way, and I hope they feel I delivered on my promise."

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Feeling at home writing in his studio in New York, Howard Shore received the news of his nomination for best original score for "Eastern Promises" from his assistant. "It's always wonderful to have that kind of recognition, but it's particularly wonderful because I've been working with David Cronenberg for so many years," Shore said. "This is our 12th feature film, and they actually become more detailed and creative. If you work with someone like that for so long, there's no going back -- just forward."

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Carole Bayer Sager provided the lyrics, while Clint Eastwood worked up the melody for the nominated song "Grace Is Gone." "Clint Eastwood is a guy you wouldn't think of -- if you just considered his body of work as an actor -- as someone who could write these beautiful scores and melodies," Bayer Sager said. "So I sang what I wrote to him over the phone, and I heard this quiet -- which always makes me nervous, I never think of the best-case scenario -- and he said, 'Hey, darlin' that's one terrific lyric.' I didn't think our song would get nominated, I hardly gave it any thought, but the Golden Globes are great because they do listen to everything. This has made it a very sweet week."

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"My phone rang at 5:55, and I heard this deep voice say 'Congratulations.' It was Denzel (Washington). He was literally my wake-up call," said "The Great Debaters" producer Todd Black, whose film was nominated for best drama. The two had a lot to celebrate: Washington received a best actor nom for "American Gangster," which also scored a mention for best picture.

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Jennifer Fox, a producer on "Michael Clayton," said of the film's four nominations: "I couldn't be more proud of Tony Gilroy, the movie, our cast and crew, everyone." She credited Gilroy for his "persistence and vision -- for all of this from the original conception of it, down to brilliant casting decisions and directing. It's so much his movie, the DNA of it, it's all him." She added: "Ultimately, it's about morality and very human choices. One of the things that was so sophisticated about the film is this incredible empathy for even the bad guy."

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"I'm so excited -- I didn't expect this -- I didn't even know that the nominations were today," said Alberto Iglesias, nominated for best original score for "The Kite Runner." Iglesias, who is traveling from Los Angeles to Spain today friday to work on Steven Soderbergh's latest project, said working closely with director Marc Forster helped him through a very lengthy creative process. "First I needed to understand the story and what he wanted from the music," Iglesias said. "The story is about deep emotional feeling, and music is the best way to convey that."

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It was a "pretty darn good morning" for "Juno" producer Lianne Halfon, who woke up at the crack of dawn in Los Angeles to watch the nominations live. "It was the best news I've gotten in the dark in a really long time," joked Halfon, who produced the film with Mr. Mudd producing partners John Malkovich and Russell Smith. Halfon said she knew "Juno" was special right off the bat when Mandate Pictures brought the script to the producing trio. "That was the first time a financier brought us a script that we responded to right away," she said. "It's such an incredible combination of this sort of intelligence and openheartedness." The movie also marked the first time the Mr. Mudd producers, who usually work on films with a serious slant, took on a "feel-good" film. "We really want to make another one!" Halfon said.

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"We're all pleasantly surprised but thrilled," producer Jennifer Todd said about the nomination for "Across the Universe." "This was a huge undertaking and took such an incredible effort from everyone." Todd described the nomination as a "nice, bright moment" despite the impact felt from the ongoing writers strike. "It's been very hard on everyone, but what's nice is that it has been such a great year for film with so many nontraditional movies and great performances. We feel really blessed with this nomination."

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Michael Brook, who garnered a nomination (with Kaki King and Eddie Vedder) for best original score for "Into the Wild" was up early tending to his 3-month-old when he got word of his nomination. "I'm thrilled and honored. You just don't get many chances to work on projects of this quality and commitment," Brook said. "Working with the caliber of producers who supported the vision of a director like Sean Penn -- this is a rare thing."

Compiled by Nellie Andreeva, Carolyn Giardina, Karl Gibson, Carly Mayberry, Gretta Parkinson and Leslie Simmons in Los Angeles and Steven Zeitchik and Gregg Goldstein in New York.

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