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Guns N' Roses Announce February Concerts

Guns N' Roses GNR Stage - H 2011
Getty Images

The Axl Rose-fronted, Slash-less rock band is set to perform six shows in Chicago, New Jersey and New York City, where it will stage a return to the music venue formerly known as The Ritz, now dubbed Webster Hall.

Attention Guns N' Roses fans: your favorite band is prepping a comeback at the concert hall it made famous on the MTV special "Live at The Ritz" 24 years ago.

Webster Hall, named The Ritz in Guns N' Roses' heyday, is located in New York City's East Village and hosts a revolving door of acts from A-list to indie up-and-comers. In 1988, MTV filmed the group's performance at the venue, and the resulting concert footage remains required fan viewing to this day.

According to an announcement Monday, Axl Rose and company will perform at Webster on Feb. 15, and the marquee sign will be switched to The Ritz for the occasion. In addition, the band announced two other shows in New York on Feb. 10 at Roseland Ballroom and Feb. 12 at Terminal 6.

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Following The Ritz return, Guns will head westward for a show at Chicago's House of Blues on Feb. 19, followed by outings back East on Feb. 23 at The Fillmore in Silver Spring, Md., and Feb. 24 at the House of Blues in Atlantic City, N.J.

Former guitarist Slash will be MIA, of course, now that he's a movie producer (and estranged from Rose, the fickle and polarizing frontman). Last week, Anchor Bay picked up the rights to Nothing to Fear, a horror movie that marks the feature producing debut of the musician and his new horror label Slasher Films.

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Guns N' Roses was recently announced as a 2012 inductee into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame, leading to speculation about a potential Appetite For Destruction-era reunion between Rose and Slash. But a recent video game lawsuit brought forth by Rose suggests otherwise: the singer claims that Activision's use of the song "Welcome to the Jungle" in Guitar Hero III violated a deal not to use Slash in the hit game. (GNR Music, which administers publishing rights to the band's songs, licensed Activision to use that big hit, but Rose claims that he was fraudulently induced into that agreement.)

That case is tentatively scheduled to go to trial in May, several weeks after the band's April 14 induction in Cleveland.