'Harry Potter' Finale: Rupert Grint, David Heyman, Phelps Twins Give First Look at CineEurope

Courtesy of Warner Bros. Pictures

Confab attendees were the first the see the concluding chapter in the Potter films, a week ahead of the film's official premiere in London.

AMSTERDAM - Harry Potter star Rupert Grint, producer David Heyman and James and Oliver Phelps, who play the twins Fred and George Weasley in the films, took the stage at European exhibitors conference CineEurope to introduce Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows, Part 2, the final film in what has become the biggest grossing franchise of all time.

"I can't believe it's really over," said Grint before thanking the international exhibitors in attendance at the screening. "You're the ones who've brought these films to the fans."

Heyman, who produced all of the Potter movies and received the Producer of the Decade honor from CineEurope on Thursday, also thanked international exhibitors for their support over the last 10 years of Potter mania.

CineEurope attendees were the first the see the concluding chapter in the Potter films, a week ahead of the film's official premiere in London next week. Judging by the reactions after the screening, they were impressed.

"A brilliant ending to the franchise," said one German attendee. "It's going to be the most successful Potter ever."

The final film seems destined to top the $954 million global take of Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows, Part 1 and become the only $1 billion title in the franchise. Not only is Harry Potter 7 Pt.2 the concluding chapter, it is also the only Potter in 3D.

"Warner Bros. spent a small fortune trying to make the last one in 3D but we couldn't manage it, manage to get the quality we wanted," Heyman said. "So its great they gave us the chance to do this one in 3D the way it should be."

Heyman concluded by giving a shout out to, of all people, Transformers director Michael Bay.

"It might sound odd, but I want to thank Michael Bay because he's been saying how important it is to show 3D with the right luminescence. And that's very important for this film, a lot of which was shot at night or with very low illumination," Heyman said, asking exhibitors "if you're lights aren't burnt out by showing Transformers 3," to screen the final Harry Potter at the bright end of possible illumination.

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