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Film Movement Acquires Film Rights to 'Hitler's Children'

Adolf Hitler Helga Goebbels
Adolf Hitler with Helga Goebbels, the daughter of Nazi propagandist Joseph Goebbels

The documentary examines the devastating impact of being related to leaders of the Nazi regime.

Film Movement has acquired domestic distribution rights to Hitler's Children, an Israeli documentary about the descendants of top Nazi officials, including Adolf Eichmann, Hermann Goring, Heinrich Himmler and Hans Frank.

Hitler's Children will open in New York in the third quarter of 2012 with a limited national roll out to follow. It will premiere day and date on VOD.

The documentary, which has been lauded at several Jewish film festivals around the world, introduces audiences to the children, grandchildren, nieces and nephews of these infamous men.

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Many of these descendants have spent their lives trying to divorce themselves from their Nazi lineage, including Niklas Frank, son of Hans Frank and godson of Adolf Hitler (Hitler was childless). Niklas Frank has spent his life speaking out against his father, often touring Germany to lecture about him and the Nazi regime.

Bettina Goring also is profiled in the documentary. The great-niece of Hermann Goring, Hitler's second in command, she lives in voluntary exile in Santa Fe, N.M.. Both she and her brother decided to be sterilized as to end their family line.

The acquisition was negotiated by Film Movement president Adley Gartenstein and vice president of acquisitions and distribution Rebeca Conget for Film Movement, and Cinephil's managing director Philippa Kowarsky on behalf of the filmmakers.

"This film is important, and powerful, and emotional on so many levels. It makes you question the idea of inherited guilt and responsibility and the power of history on the individual's psyche," Conget said. "We are hoping it will be seen by millions of people in North America, and open up dialog and discussion on the effects of the Holocaust on not just the victims, but the perpetrators' descendants."