Pret-a-Reporter

Hollywood’s Custom Tailor

Barry Wetcher/Twentieth Century Fox

The industry’s best-dressed men onscreen and off button up in bespoke shirts from Anto Beverly Hills.

There’s only one shop for men who want to add a touch of Gordon Gekko’s “Bespoked Stealth Wealth” or Danny Ocean’s “Contemporary Rat Pack” style to their wardrobes: Anto Beverly Hills.

The family-run custom shirtmaker on North Beverly Drive, known for creating looks for such movies as Ocean’s Eleven and Casino, hit the screen in a big way in 2010. In addition to cutting Michael Douglas’ Hi Hollywood and Hi English spread collars in Wall Street: Money Never Sleeps (both now best-sellers), Anto worked with the industry’s top costume designers to create shirts for True Grit, Inception, Morning Glory, Alice in Wonderland, Knight and Day and Iron Man 2. “We made 200 shirts just for Inception,” says Jack Sepetjian, son of the late founder Anto Sepetjian, who runs the family business with younger brother Ken. “It’s one of the biggest projects we’ve ever done because it called for so many wardrobe changes.”

For this year, Anto already has more than a few onscreen appearances buttoned up: “I was on set for Leonardo DiCaprio’s fitting last week for his J. Edgar Hoover film,” Sepetjian says.

The company also houses the personal measurements and collar and cuff preferences of many of Hollywood’s most sharply dressed execs, agents and leading men.

“Our vault has more than 9,500 files dating all the way back to 1955, when Dad first started the company,” Sepetjian says. “We still have Dean Martin and Frank Sinatra’s shirt orders on file.” You can walk into the shop today and ask for a “Dean Martin cuff” (white, 3¼ inches wide) and get the real deal. (Anto merged with longtime Rat Pack clothier Nat Wise in 1987.)

The word “bespoke” is thrown around a bit carelessly these days, but few offer Anto’s level of detailing. As you’d expect from the world’s top tailors, the shop — whose cotton shirts start at $325 (an off-the-rack Brioni can run $425-$450) — cuts its materials by hand and takes as many as 20 precise measurements (“neck measurements within 1/16th of an inch”). They also offer one of the largest selections of fabrics: some 3,000 choices, all Italian- or Swiss-milled. And unlike companies that send out measurements, Anto tailors its shirts on site.

“The reason why celebrities and businessmen alike turn to Anto is that they truly care about what you look like, and it shows in their shirts,” ICM’s Jack Gilardi says.

Other loyal clients include Universal Studios’ Ron Meyer, SDB Partners’ Louis Bershad and Sony TV president Steve Mosko, who first received an Anto gift certificate from Seinfeld executive producers Howard West and George Shapiro for Christmas in 2002. “I went home, took all of my other shirts out of my closet, and have been wearing Jack’s and Ken’s shirts ever since.”               

THE 5 BEST CUSTOM SHIRT-MAKERS EVER: Men’s style expert Glenn O’Brien weighs in on his favorites

1. Ascot Chang
“The Hong Kong-based house has been making shirts for 70 years,” O’Brien says. “They offer more than 3,500 fabrics, including some very charming vintage items from the ’50s and ’60s.” ascotchang.com

2. Charvet
“It was the world’s first shirt shop, founded in 1838, and it has been in its present quarter on the Place Vendome since 1877,” says O’Brien, who wears the luxe French label’s shirts. “Charvet’s customer list is unbeatable including Charles Baudelaire, the great theorist of dandyism, and Cary Grant.” charvet.com

3. Hamilton
“It’s a family business based in Houston that has been making shirts since 1883,” O’Brien says of the company that makes Brian Williams’ shirts for NBC Nightly News. “They hand-cut from over 350 fabrics, using a paper pattern created for each client.” hamiltonshirts.com

4. Anto Beverly Hills
“Anto has as many movie stars on its wall as Sardi’s restaurant in New York,” O’Brien says. “Whatever you want, they can make it.”
antoshirts.com

5. Battistoni
“Their elegant style is the perfect complement to the nipped-at-the-waist Italian suit,” O’Brien says. “Their shirts are famous for their clean cut and shapely fit: The armholes are high, the torsos are slim. It’s a shirt that keeps at least one of my friends going to the gym.” battistoni.com

O’Brien’s book, How to Be a Man: A Guide to Style and Behavior for the Modern Gentleman, is set to be released in April.

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