Judd Apatow Calls Bill Cosby "One of the Most Awful People that You've Ever Heard Of"

Douglas Gorenstein/NBC
Judd Apatow on 'The Tonight Show'

"I think it's the worst thing that's ever happened in show business," the director said of the scandal involving the comedian.

Judd Apatow's newest film, Trainwreck, is a hit at the box office, but the director appeared on CNN's New Day to talk about another matter entirely: Bill Cosby.

Apatow has been a vocal critic of the comedian following extensive accusations that he drugged and sexually assaulted more than two dozen women over the last several decades. On Monday, he performed a scathing impersonation of Cosby on The Tonight Show.

On New Day, Apatow continued going after the beleaguered comedian, calling Cosby "one of the most awful people that you've ever heard of" and declaring with no uncertainty that he "think[s] it's the worst thing that's ever happened in show business."

The director also pointed out that the accusations do shed valuable light on problems within the legal system when it comes to sexual assault. "But what's important about it is that there are things to learn, which is, all these statutes of limitations are way too short," said Apatow. "There's no reason why in California it should be six years. I mean, for violent crimes it should be decades."

Asked why he thinks that Cosby got a pass for so long, Apatow compared him to a "pedophile priest," saying, "He's done an enormous amount of positive things for the world, but then he has this other side of his personality that's really hurting people. And no one wants to attack the person who's been so charitable."

"And who's a black guy. Let's be honest," interrupted host Michaela Pereira.

Apatow managed to dodge the race issue, answering, "Yeah and who's done so much amazing and important work. That's what makes it so tragic."

He also pointed out that Cosby's victims were particularly vulnerable as young women with aspirations to rise in a business where Cosby holds enormous power: "If most of your victims are actresses, they're not going to speak up because they think, 'Oh, I'm never going to work again.' "

Toward the end of the interview, Apatow highlighted the excess of Cosby's prescriptions for Quaaludes as firm evidence of his intent. He also said of Whoopi Goldberg, who's backed away from her initial defense of Cosby, "I think she's turned around in a big way."

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