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Kate Middleton's Wedding Dress: All the Details

Her Sarah Burton for Alexander McQueen gown features an 8-foot train, hand-made lace appliqué and ivory silk tulle flowers.
Kirsty Wigglesworth - WPA Pool/Getty Images

Kate Middleton wed Prince William in London Friday in a Sarah Burton for Alexander McQueen lace wedding dress.

Why did she choose the gown? PHOTOS: What Kate Middleton and famous guests wore to the wedding

"Miss Middleton chose British brand Alexander McQueen for the beauty of its craftsmanship and its respect for traditional workmanship and the technical construction of clothing.  Miss Middleton wished for her dress to combine tradition and modernity with the artistic vision that characterises Alexander McQueen’s work.  Miss Middleton worked closely with Sarah Burton in formulating the design of her dress," read a statement on the official royal Web sitePHOTOS: Kate Middleton and Prince William say "I Do"

"The dress epitomises timeless British craftsmanship by drawing together talented and skilled workmanship from across the United Kingdom.  The dress design pays tribute to the Arts and Crafts tradition, which advocated truth to materials and traditional craftsmanship using simple forms and often Romantic styles of decoration.  Ms Burton’s design draws on this heritage, additionally giving the cut and the intricate embellishment a distinctive, contemporary and feminine character," it continues. PHOTOS: Famous royal weddings

"The lace appliqué for the bodice and skirt was hand-made by the Royal School of Needlework, based at Hampton Court Palace.  The lace design was hand-engineered (appliquéd) using the Carrickmacross lace-making technique, which originated in Ireland in the 1820s.  Individual flowers have been hand-cut from lace and hand-engineered onto ivory silk tulle to create a unique and organic design, which incorporates the rose, thistle, daffodil and shamrock," the Web site goes on. PHOTOS: The 9 wackiest wedding celebrations

Middleton's train was "two metres 70 centimeters," or about eight-and-a-half feet.

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