KFPA backs Web filtering system

Move kicks off P2P downloading crackdown

SEOUL -- A local copyright collective will push to require all movie sites to install a digital filtering system, which will prevent its users from uploading unauthorized content on the Web by the end of the year, said the Korean Film Producers Association.
 
In a joint press conference held Wednesday with the Digital Content Network Association, representatives of the two groups explained that all P2P sites that refuse to adopt the system by year-end will face “severe measures.” As of Tuesday, a network of 78 local P2P sites, accounting for roughly 90% of online movie downloading sites here, have agreed to install the software, which tracks down unauthorized files on the Web using an audio encoding system.
 
“From now on, the failure to install the software will be taken as an offense against consumers and copyright holders,” said the association in a press release. “We will seek stern legal measures.”
 
The group’s increasingly harsh tone is largely due to the uneven distribution of the filtering installment, which created major business loss for P2P sites that have already installed the software.
 
The need for copyright protection continues to be an issue here. On the same day of the conference, CJ Entertainment announced that “Thirst,” the director Park Chan-wook’s latest vampire flick, had been leaked to downloading sites in Korea and United States. In August, the hit disaster film “Haeundae” had also been circulated on the Web, pushing the distributer to file a lawsuit.
 
“Thirst” is currently waiting for a DVD release later this month, and CJ is working to settle the matter with Universal Pictures, which has the film’s North American distribution rights.
 
“I heard the news yesterday at an event to celebrate ‘Good Downloader Supporters Day’,” Park said, referring to a campaign mobilized by local film companies to promote legal downloading. “One of the critical declines of Korean cinema is the demolition of the ancillary market and it’s appalling to hear that ‘Thirst’ has become one of them.
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