Colin Kaepernick Actor in Jason Whitlock Bit Apologizes for "Optics" of Impersonation

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Christopher "Kid" Reid and Christopher "Play" Martin.

"Let me be clear — the skit and photo were not meant to disrespect Colin's message or political stance. Rather, we wanted to spoof the media's treatment of him and the circus that has been created," Christopher "Kid" Reid of Kid 'n Play, who dressed up as the NFL quarterback, said.

Christopher “Kid” Reid on Thursday broke his silence over his controversial impersonation of Colin Kaepernick.

Reid, better known as half of the hip-hop turned acting duo Kid ‘n Play, was blasted after Fox Sports 1's Jason Whitlock posted a picture from a later scrapped skit of the actor and musician dressed in a Kaepernick jersey with an afro and a raised gloved fist in air, resembling the Black Power Movement gesture.

The image was seen by critics as wildly mocking Kaepernick, the free agent quarterback who made national headlines last season when he refused to stand for the national anthem in protest of the treatment of African-Americans in America, especially at the hands of police.

In a lengthy post on Facebook, Reid explained what he was going for in the skit that never made it to air. 

"Let me be clear — the skit and photo were not meant to disrespect Colin's message or political stance," he wrote. "Rather, we wanted to spoof the media's treatment of him and the circus that has been created. I understand that Whitlock has been a vocal critic of Colin so the optics of the photo have got me looking crazy."

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Reid said in the post that he stands with the Super Bowl QB. 

"Being born and raised in NYC I grew up seeing and reading about dozens of acts of police brutality," he said. "And the same way we know the names of Tamir Rice, Philando Castile and Michael Brown today, I grew up knowing the same fate had come to Eleanor Bumpurs, Amadou Diallo and Abner Louima. Sadly, little has changed."

Having learned a lesson from the incident, the actor said he would be more mindful in the future.

"Moving forward, I recognize the danger of optics without proper explanation — people race to their own conclusions, good and bad," Reid wrote. "I also have to accept my part in this controversy — the fact that my rep was taking hits was shocking at first — but I've come to a healthy understanding of how some people were dismayed by what went down."

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