L.A. Weatherman George Fischbeck Dies at 92

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George Fischbeck

Colorful KABC and KCBS forecaster was known for teaching weather concepts during his segment.

Longtime KABC weatherman George Fischbeck, who presented the weather forecast for nearly two decades, has died, according to the Los Angeles Times. He was 92.

Fischbeck, who joined KABC in 1972 and was known as “Dr. George,” died Wednesday of natural causes at his home at the Motion Picture & Television Country House in Woodland Hills.

A meteorologist who trained with the Air National Guard during the Korean War, he would sometimes use his segment to explain complex weather concepts instead of the forecast. Fischbeck, who often wore a bow tie and black-rimmed glasses, resembled an enthusiastic professor rather than a typical weatherman.

In a 2013 interview with New Mexico in Focus, Fischbeck explained, “Enthusiasm is a wonderful thing to have. And I was just bubbling over inside. I get excited about things. There is so much to get excited about. I get excited about the weather. All I can do — I can look into a girl’s eyes and tell weather or not.”

Born in New Jersey on July 1, 1922, Fischbeck was curious about science and weather at an early age. He studied archaeology and geology at the University of New Mexico and earned his bachelor’s degree and a master’s in education, teaching science for 23 years in Albuquerque. “I could teach kids anything once I had their attention, and if I could make them smile, they would even remember it,” he had told People in 1981. He later hosted a children’s science show on public television, which led to his job as the weatherman at KABC.

Fischbeck retired from KABC in 1990, but returned to TV for a brief time at KCBS from 1994 to 1997. “Dr. George was my greatest inspiration. No doubt about it. When you come into the office every day, he had such enthusiasm,” said KABC meteorologist Dallas Raines.

Fischbeck is survived by his wife, Susanne, his daughter, Nancy, and a granddaughter.

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