Lena Dunham Releases '100 Years' Video Honoring Planned Parenthood

Former Planned Parenthood president Faye Wattleton is depicted in the animated film.

Meryl Streep, America Ferrera, Hari Nef, Mindy Kaling and Jennifer Lawrence are among the narrators featured in the animated film.

On Tuesday, Lena Dunham premiered 100 Years, an animated short film about Planned Parenthood she co-directed, via her Lenny Letter and Now This Her.

"We’ve been working on the film for over a year in an attempt to shed light on Planned Parenthood’s remarkable history and ongoing battle to keep serving the people who show up to their health centers every day of the year," said Dunham. "I really think it’s the best cartoon about the history of reproductive freedom ever made, but it may also be the only cartoon about the history of reproductive freedom ever made."

Meryl Streep, America Ferrera, Hari Nef, Mindy Kaling, Jennifer Lawrence and Constance Wu also collaborated on the film, lending their voices as narrators. The film tells the history of Planned Parenthood, from when Margaret Sanger started the organization to when the birth control pill was created, and discusses abortion-related legislation like Roe v. Wade and the Hyde Amendment.

"The spirit behind this video will hopefully take us into the Women’s March on Washington this weekend, where we will be showing our new president that we’re not going to allow a hundred years of progress to disappear overnight," said Dunham, referring to the Women's March that thousands of women are expected to attend Jan. 21. 

Dunham shared that she plans to lobby against the defunding of Planned Parenthood in Sacramento on Tuesday. She also designed a boxing glove T-shirt to benefit Planned Parenthood.

In Lenny Letter, writer and activist Janet Mock interviewed the women organizing the Women's March, touching on the initial problems the march had with intersectionality. 

"Unity feels like a utopian, almost mythical goal in these United States of America," writes Mock. "It is difficult, backbreaking work to build and organize among varying identities, experiences, and urgencies — even under the umbrella of womanhood."

Mock explained how the founders of the march recruited more diverse leaders with experience organizing, steering the march "toward a more intersectional and inclusive lens." Carmen Perez, in her interview with Mock, explained that starting at 10 a.m. Saturday, speakers will talk about different issues and there will be performances; the march itself will begin at 1 p.m., once the programming has concluded.

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